U.S. Drone Missile Attacks Arouse Anger In Pakistan A March 17 attack that reportedly killed at least 40 people has sparked protests. Though the drone attacks target militants, civilians say they are the ones suffering. Businesses have been abandoned, hospitals have seen an increase in depression and militants allegedly have targeted Pakistanis as spies.
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U.S. Drone Missile Attacks Arouse Anger In Pakistan

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U.S. Drone Missile Attacks Arouse Anger In Pakistan

U.S. Drone Missile Attacks Arouse Anger In Pakistan

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Islamabad.

JULIE MCCARTHY: Crowd: (Foreign language spoken)

MCCARTHY: A growing number has the sense that the U.S. is taking them for granted. Imran Khan, former cricket player turned politician, appealed to that sentiment in the large rally in Islamabad.

IMRAN KHAN: (Foreign language spoken)

MCCARTHY: A shepherd from North Waziristan, a region of mountains and neglect, Khan is a now a psychiatric patient, suffering extreme depression. He can barely mumble his name. Resham's brother Mulaqat sits on the bed beside him and says his brother's decline began with a drone strike last summer.

MULAQAT KHAN: (Foreign language spoken)

MCCARTHY: Rahim-ullah Wazir, a shopkeeper, lives in Miran Shah, the main city of North Waziristan, a no-go zone for Western journalists. We reached him by phone.

RAHIM: (Foreign language spoken)

MCCARTHY: Resident Rahim-ullah Wazir says, If anyone thinks that people here are happy over the drone strikes, they are foolish.

WAZIR: (Foreign language spoken)

MCCARTHY: Julie McCarthy, NPR News, Islamabad.

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