Opening Panel Round Our panelists answer questions about the week's news: Body Scanners at Old Navy; Mommy's Little Helper.
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Opening Panel Round

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Opening Panel Round

Opening Panel Round

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PETER SAGAL, Host:

We want to remind everyone they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago. For tickets and more information, about attending our shows in Chicago or our upcoming show, in Nashville, Tennessee, on June 30th, go to wbez.org or you can find a link at our website, which is watiwait.npr.org.

Right now, Panel, it's time for you to answer some questions about the week's news. Faith, people complain about the TSA body scanners, but now there's a great new use for them, what?

FAITH SALIE: Oh, finding the right size of clothes.

SAGAL: Exactly right.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: A company called My Best Fit is taking two potentially humiliating experiences, going through airport security, and trying on jeans, and combining them into a perfect shame hybrid.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Here's how it works. They put TSA style scanners in shopping malls, and before you hit the stores, you get a full body scan to determine your exact measurements. It saves you time when shopping, and you can buy a souvenir photo of your nude body, suitable for framing.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SALIE: You might not appreciate this enough, being a man, because vanity sizing has gone bananas for women. You know, if you buy really, really high end clothes, a woman could be, say, an eight. Then you go to Old Navy and you're a negative triple zero.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

ROY BLOUNT: You mean you'd buy things smaller than you...

SALIE: So these stores know that you're going to - if I try on something that's a smaller size, it makes me feel great about myself. So I'm more inclined to buy it.

SAGAL: Right. But what's amazing is, like, your gratitude is a symbol if this. It's like, how quickly people's attitudes change. Because like you go into one of these things at the airport and you're like no way, no way are you invading my privacy, TSA, no way are you taking this surreptitious nude photo of me. And then you go into the mall and you're like, oh my god, it'll help me get into jeans that fit. Here, should I take off my clothes? Will that help the machine?

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SALIE: Exactly.

SAGAL: What do you need me to do?

PAULA POUNDSTONE: Wait a minute. But have people accepted this idea?

SAGAL: Yes.

POUNDSTONE: Or have they just put it out there?

SAGAL: I think...

POUNDSTONE: Because what I think is a good idea is that you buy jeans at the airport.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: Is this why you're always getting in the cab to go to the airport after the show with no pants on?

POUNDSTONE: That's exactly right. I may as well.

SAGAL: Faith, two US wineries, one based in New York and one in California, are going to federal court over a supposed trademark violation. They each want to be known as the wine especially made just for whom?

SALIE: A box.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: No, this is the intended consumer, not the vehicle of delivery.

BLOUNT: A box?

SAGAL: Two wine companies, one based in California, one based in New Jersey and they both use the same term in their wine label.

BLOUNT: Oh.

SALIE: Just for kids.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Close.

SALIE: Close? Okay. Just for pregnant women.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You said pregnant women, it's close enough. The answer is mommies.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SAGAL: It turns out "Desperate Housewives" isn't just a hit TV show; it's a growing demographic for fine wine.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: California winery Clos Lachance wines claims their brand name Mommyjuice is nothing like Mommy's Time Out, the brand of wine sold by the New Jersey company that filed the suit. Both wineries apparently hope to tap into a similar market, terrible mothers.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: But distributors in New Jersey claim they thought of it first, and they worry similar labels will just confuse the customers who are, of course, already drunk by 3 p.m.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Sommeliers describe the wine, the mommy wines, as being full-bodied with subtle hints of diaper and top notes of minivans and sleep deprivation.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

BLOUNT: No, don't have that. That's Mommy's Juice.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

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