After Sept. 11, 'He Wanted Me To Live A Full Life' Beverly Eckert lost her husband, Sean Rooney, on Sept. 11, 2001. He called her from the 105th floor of the World Trade Center's south tower. As the smoke got thicker, he told Beverly he loved her, over and over. Later, she became an advocate for families affected by the tragedy.
NPR logo

After Sept. 11, 'He Wanted Me To Live A Full Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135995930/135996380" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
After Sept. 11, 'He Wanted Me To Live A Full Life'

After Sept. 11, 'He Wanted Me To Live A Full Life'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/135995930/135996380" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, Host:

Today, someone who made it her mission to talk about those memories. Beverly Eckert lost her husband, Sean Rooney, in the south tower of the World Trade Center. She remembered him for StoryCorps, a regular feature on this program.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

StoryCorps is trying to record at least one interview for each person who died on 9/11. So far more than 1,000 stories have been collected. Beverly Eckert taped her StoryCorps tribute to Sean five years after he died.

BEVERLY ECKERT: Sean had warm brown eyes and dark curly hair and he was a good hugger. We met when we were only 16 at a high school dance. When he died, we were 50.

WERTHEIMER: You know, and he kissed me goodbye before leaving for work. I could still say that was just a little while ago, that was only this morning. And I just think of myself as living life for both of us now. And I like to think that Sean would be proud of me.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

WERTHEIMER: Beverly Eckert remembering her husband Sean Rooney. He was killed in the World Trade Center on 9/11. Beverly became an advocate for 9/11 families but she did not live to hear the news of Osama bin Laden's death. Beverly Eckert died in a plane crash two years ago. Her tribute, along with all the others, will be archived at the Library of Congress and at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum.

Copyright © 2011 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.