Becoming An American: A Proud Canadian's Story All jokes about the weather and the accents aside, NPR's Jackie Northam has always been proud to be Canadian. This month though, she raised her right hand and took the oath to become an American citizen. In this essay she explains why after 15 years, she is ready to call herself an American.
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Becoming An American: A Proud Canadian's Story

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Becoming An American: A Proud Canadian's Story

Becoming An American: A Proud Canadian's Story

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LIANE HANSEN, Host:

Earlier this month, one of NPR's long-time correspondents, Jackie Northam, became one of America's newest citizens. Here she explains how the U.S. naturalization process allowed her to better understand the meaning of home.

JACKIE NORTHAM: I stood during the Oath, right hand raised, my left hand holding an American flag and a white Kleenex to wipe the tears that were flowing freely. And then it was over. I and 101 other people had just become an Americans. And the very first thing I did was fill out my voter registration form and put it in the mail.

HANSEN: This is NPR News.

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