FIFA's President Wins Reelection Despite allegations of corruption, bribery and mismanagement under his watch, Sepp Blatter was re-elected Wednesday for a fourth term as president of FIFA, soccer's international governing body. Robert Siegel speaks with BBC sports reporter Alex Capstick in Zurich, about the decision to re-elect Blatter. Capstick says Blatter has the support of FIFA's executive committee and has already proposed new rules on how World Cup host countries should be selected in the future.
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FIFA's President Wins Reelection

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FIFA's President Wins Reelection

FIFA's President Wins Reelection

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

He was asked about a crisis at a news conference in Zurich on Monday.

NORRIS: Crisis, what is a crisis? If somebody of you would describe to me what there is a crisis, then I would answer. Football is not in a crisis.

SIEGEL: Well, joining us from Zurich is sports reporter Alex Capstick of the BBC. And Alex, would you say FIFA in a crisis?

NORRIS: He thinks he's the man to lead them out of the choppy waters, as he described them, and the members have trusted him in that.

CONAN, Host:

Now, shortly after his re-election, Blatter moved towards one change for FIFA: Rather than letting only the 24 members of the executive committee vote on which countries get to host the World Cup, he would have all 208 soccer federations vote. Is that likely to be an improvement or just more opportunity for vote-selling?

NORRIS: The executive committee will make up a short list, but they won't recommend any of them, and the 208 national associations will sit down and decide what to do, who should get the World Cup.

SIEGEL: The president of the German football federation has called upon FIFA to re-examine its award of those games to Qatar. Is there any serious possibility of the federation revisiting that and changing the site of the games, or once they make a decision, is it obviously going to stick?

NORRIS: But now the head of the German federation has asked for that process to be revised, and FIFA will have to answer his question.

SIEGEL: Alex Capstick of the BBC, thanks for talking with us.

NORRIS: Thank you.

SIEGEL: Alex Capstick, a sports reporter for the BBC, spoke to us from Zurich, where FIFA today re-elected president Sepp Blatter by an overwhelming majority.

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