A Summer Haircut? Don't Count On A Whole New You Summer is a time for kicking back and doing all those things people don't do at other times of the year. But balancing spontaneity and impulsiveness can be an art. Commentator Laura Lorson has learned to relax and embrace her more questionable summertime decisions.
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A Summer Haircut? Don't Count On A Whole New You

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A Summer Haircut? Don't Count On A Whole New You

A Summer Haircut? Don't Count On A Whole New You

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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

But commentator Laura Lorson has this warning for those about to let their summer guard down.

LAURA LORSON: You'll be caught up in the moment and forget that ridiculous Dorothy Hamill cut you had in the fifth grade. You'll get excited about the prospect of buying cool new hair products like pomade, and you'll forget that one girl you went to college with who wanted to look like the lead singer of the Cranberries, and ended up having to buy a wig.

SIEGEL: I should get that hair out of your pretty face so people can see your eyes. Also, stand up straight and don't mumble. So of course, I naturally hesitate and dismiss the short hair idea out of hand.

SIEGEL: Anyway, last week, I, myself, got the pixie cut because I pretty much am the queen of questionable decision making. So go ahead. Live on the edge. Get the haircut, date the drummer, have the electric-blue-colored shaved ice, ride the roller coaster six times in a row. After all, that's the sort of thing summer is for.

SIEGEL: Laura Lorson is over the haircut thing, and is now considering getting sleeve tattoos in Perry, Kansas.

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