A Chinese Dissident Is Freed, But He's Still Not Free Ai Weiwei has bluntly accused the Chinese government of corruption, coercion, and cover-ups. After his release from prison this week, he refused to speak publicly and shut down his Twitter account. But Ai's art goes on talking.
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A Chinese Dissident Is Freed, But He's Still Not Free

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A Chinese Dissident Is Freed, But He's Still Not Free

A Chinese Dissident Is Freed, But He's Still Not Free

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SCOTT SIMON, Host:

His piece, Circle of Animals, is on display at London's Somerset House this weekend - the 12 animal heads of the Chinese zodiac. But the mouths of the dragon, rat, and other animals of the Chinese calendar are open and animated, like they're talking. And Ai Weiwei has carved below: Without freedom of speech there is no modern world, just the barbaric one.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: This is NPR News.

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