Health Care Decision A Blow To Law's Opponents The decision by the Cincinnati-based court took on a special importance because one of the judges upholding the law, Jeffrey Sutton, is a prominent conservative. As a litigator, he made modern states' rights arguments in the U.S. Supreme Court. But in this case, he rejected similar arguments in the context of the national health care law.
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Federal Appeals Court Upholds Health Care Law

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Federal Appeals Court Upholds Health Care Law

Federal Appeals Court Upholds Health Care Law

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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

NPR's Nina Totenberg reports.

NINA TOTENBERG: But in this case, he rejected those arguments, as well as the argument that Congress exceeded its authority in requiring people to have health care insurance or pay a penalty.

TOM GOLDSTEIN: This has to be terrible news for opponents of the statute.

TOTENBERG: Supreme Court advocate Tom Goldstein, an astute court observer notes that Judge Sutton is among the most respected appeals court judges in the country.

GOLDSTEIN: He's also incredibly well-known to the Supreme Court as a former Supreme Court law clerk who argued a lot of the most important states' rights cases on the side of the states. And so his view that the statute is constitutional really overwhelmingly likely represents a view of the center and center-right of the Supreme Court and so a majority.

TOTENBERG: Nina Totenberg, NPR News, Washington.

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