Letters: Violence And Teens And Vaccinations NPR's Neal Conan reads listener comments from the previous week's shows including dating violence in teen relationships, learning how to share your story as a memoir and the changing college classroom in this digital age. Also, a listener takes issue with our conversation on vaccines.
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Letters: Violence And Teens And Vaccinations

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Letters: Violence And Teens And Vaccinations

Letters: Violence And Teens And Vaccinations

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NEAL CONAN, host: It's Tuesday, and time to read from your comments. Last week, after we asked for your stories about dating violence, Boyd Pellet(ph) from Gainesville, Florida, wrote: I was in a two-year relationship with a young woman my age who'd just gotten out of an emotionally abusive relationship with one of our mutual friends. I had no idea about the abuse within the prior relationship until we've been dating for around a year and she felt comfortable enough to tell me. This previous relationship had caused her severe emotional distress and was a major contributing factor to her developing a relatively severe case of depression, which made our own relationship very hard on both sides.

We also got a lot of response when we talked about how to write a memoir. E. Mary Roe(ph) from Wichita shared this story: My 10-year-old son is writing a memoir about his grandpa's early life. My father grew up at the end of The Depression and came of age during World War II. My son finds the stories grandpa tells of working to buy his first bike, growing up in a struggling family and such very comforting as we have fallen on hard times, too.

In our conversation about how universities ought to adapt to the digital age, Don Tapscott argued that the Net generation learns differently than their elders. Thomas Wong(ph) from San Francisco wrote to take issue. I'm a student at American University in Washington, D.C. From my experience, I don't think we learn differently in terms of technology. To be honest, I think students hate using social media in the classroom. A professor who requires students to use social media merely indicates that he or she is out of touch with why we use tools like Twitter, Facebook and blogs. We use social media for mindless activity, to comment on our friends' photos or talk about the latest party. I enjoy lectures and I love asking questions in class, but the idea that professors need to use social media to teach us is incorrect.

Finally, we got a long letter from a listener very disappointed with our interview yesterday with David Ropeik. We talked about vaccines and the risks posed to public health by those who opt out. Among her complains, that we did not check his client list. His website lists Abbott pharmaceuticals among the companies his risk-management firm has worked with. We should have disclosed that, and we apologize for the omission. We also checked back with David Ropeik, who told us he never worked on vaccination issues with Abbott, any other pharmaceutical company or with the government.

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