Syria Conflict May Be Shifting Flow Of Fighters In a tribal region long known as a transit point for fighters and weapons entering Iraq during the war, the route might be reversing. Syrian state TV recently claimed fighters are now coming into Syria, to help in the battle against the government.
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Syria Conflict May Be Shifting Flow Of Fighters

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Syria Conflict May Be Shifting Flow Of Fighters

Syria Conflict May Be Shifting Flow Of Fighters

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ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

NPR's Kelly McEvers recently traveled to the border and sent this report.

KELLY MCEVERS: The trouble in the Syrian town of Albukamal started this past weekend. Like in so many Syrian cities and towns, people took to the streets in protest against the government of President Bashar al-Assad.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTORS)

MCEVERS: Unidentified Man #1: (unintelligible) Bashar's father. Do you see it?

MCEVERS: Unidentified Man #2: He says we are trying to do our best to protect the borders, as you can see, but it is long borders. There must be some cases of infiltration. But we are doing our best so much little we have.

MCEVERS: We asked Abdulkadir if former resistance fighters here in Qaim will find ways to help support the resistance in Syria.

AHMED ABDULKADIR: (Speaking foreign language).

MCEVERS: One woman, who goes by the name One woman, who goes by the name Um Salwan(ph), fled Iraq when insurgents fired a rocket at her house. She says life in Syria has been hard but until recently, it was still better than Iraq. That changed with the protests and the crackdowns.

UM SALWAN: (through translator) Came here only to find out things are much worse. There's nothing here.

MCEVERS: Kelly McEvers, NPR News.

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