U.S. Looks For Ways To Break Libya Stalemate Four months after NATO airstrikes began, an unyielding Moammar Gadhafi is still facing off against the opposition. The Obama administration is looking for ways to tip the scales. One U.S. official is pushing for using clandestine action to target Gadhafi.
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U.S. Looks For Ways To Break Libya Stalemate

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U.S. Looks For Ways To Break Libya Stalemate

U.S. Looks For Ways To Break Libya Stalemate

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MICHELE NORRIS, Host:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Michele Norris.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

It's been more than four months since NATO launched its first airstrikes in Libya against the forces of Moammar Gadhafi. Since then, opposition forces have gained ground, but so far, Gadhafi's military is holding firm. As NPR's Rachel Martin reports, the conflict has turned into a complicated waiting game.

RACHEL MARTIN: It doesn't matter who says it...

BARACK OBAMA: The violence must stop. Moammar Gadhafi has lost legitimacy to lead, and he must leave.

MARTIN: ...or how many times

HILLARY CLINTON: It is time for Gadhafi to go now without further violence or delay.

MARTIN: When you let something fester this long and you have an extremely weak rebel force, Gadhafi's forces have time to adapt. They use different weapons. They become far less visible targets. They start relying on land mines. They have more time in which to try to divide the people and intimidate.

NATO: In other words, the NATO operation meant to prevent one kind of humanitarian crisis may be contributing to another. Rachel Martin, NPR News, Washington.

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