Property Owners Throw Wet Blanket on Art Project Santa Barbara is famous for its beaches and its real estate prices. A proposed art project that would have showed global warming's potential impact on the California city was scrapped for fear that property values would go down.
NPR logo

Property Owners Throw Wet Blanket on Art Project

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/13966298/13966417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Property Owners Throw Wet Blanket on Art Project

Property Owners Throw Wet Blanket on Art Project

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/13966298/13966417" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Santa Barbara is famous for its beaches and its real estate prices, and an art project about one got some there panicked about the other.

Activist Bruce Caron proposed to paint blue waves at dozens of intersections to show where the water's edge would be should global warming melt Greenland's ice sheets. He was forced to scrap the project after an outcry by those below the blue line, worried this future flood would drive property values down today.

It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2007 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.