Irene Is Gone, But Disruptions Remain Irene's sweep up the East Coast caused millions to lose power this past weekend — many of whom may not have it restored for days. And although most mass transit systems are up and running again, long-distance travelers aren't so lucky: They're stranded at airports and rail stations across the region.
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Irene Disrupts Power, Commutes, Travel Plans

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Irene Disrupts Power, Commutes, Travel Plans

Irene Disrupts Power, Commutes, Travel Plans

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MELISSA BLOCK, host: Irene knocked out power to millions and threatened transportation systems up and down the East Coast. NPR's Larry Abramson has those stories.

LARRY ABRAMSON: New York City took an unprecedented step before Irene hit: it shut down bus and subway lines over the weekend. Tunnels did not flood, and the system was able to restore subway service by this morning. At Manhattan's Port Authority bus terminal, commuters like Al Yudes said his bus ride from Weehawken, New Jersey, was a breeze, in part because many couldn't make it to work.

AL YUDES: People are staying home. People a little bit farther out, they do have some flooding. There's trees down. And so they're just not taking the chance. And everybody's got a computer.

ABRAMSON: But Hurricane Irene caused havoc for many aboveground rail lines. Crews faced a maze of downed trees and branches on the tracks. That's why would-be commuters on New Jersey Transit got this message.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: With the exception of the Atlantic City rail line, all rail service remains suspended.

ABRAMSON: Long-distance travelers continue to face delays. Airlines had to unsnarl the mess created when they reschedule thousands of flights over the weekend. Many offered waivers so passengers would not have to pay rebooking fees. Amtrak temporarily shut down service over the weekend, and riders are still experiencing delays. Rail passengers at Washington, D.C.'s Union Station said they could get little information about when Amtrak might return to normal service. That meant Susan Rothschild, from New York City, was stuck in D.C.

SUSAN ROTHSCHILD: I was supposed to be on the 1:02 train, so if that train was going to New York that would have been just fine. But it's only going to Philadelphia, so I'm going to have to find my way home from Philadelphia. There are people out there with real problems, and this, to me, is not a really huge problem.

ABRAMSON: Amtrak had to cancel all train service between Boston and Philadelphia, including all high-speed Acela lines. But the lasting pain from this storm will be felt by the millions of people without power. Dominion Resources says half of its 2.4 million customers in Virginia and North Carolina lost power at some point. David Botkins, of Dominion Resources, says the map of those outages is a little surprising. Some of the worst damage was quite a ways inland where heavy winds brought down trees onto power lines.

DAVID BOTKINS: We still had extensive damage in the Outer Banks and in the Hampton Roads tidewater area. But it was equally as bad - when you look at the actual numbers of customers without power - in the central part of Virginia.

ABRAMSON: Botkins says it's the worst damage since Hurricane Isabel eight years ago, but that storm, he says, was much more serious, snapping power poles, and that takes a long time to replace. Irene's damage was less severe, and so Dominion Resources says it has already restored power to many who lost it.

Another unexpected center for outages was Baltimore. The local utility there reported half a million people still without power. And up in Connecticut, Governor Dannell Malloy said earlier today that 600,000 people in his state were without electricity.

Governor DANNELL MALLOY: We have never had as many people out of power as we have had as a result of this storm.

ABRAMSON: Thousands of utility workers are coming in from out of state, thanks to aid agreements in place for just that kind of situation. Still, many companies say their customers may have to wait until next weekend for relief. Edward Castro lives in Bristol, Rhode Island, and hopes he doesn't have to wait that long.

EDWARD CASTRO: But we've got plenty of candles, and we've got flashlights and batteries so we're OK with that. As long as the water stays on and the gas, we're doing OK.

ABRAMSON: One bright spot may be the nation's communications systems. The Federal Communications Commission reports most wireless and landline services had minimal interruptions and said all 911 services worked despite the heavy demand. Larry Abramson, NPR News, Washington.

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