Letters: Middle Children And Myths About Mormonism Neal Conan reads listeners' responses to previous segments, including closing the achievement gap in education, the benefits of being a middle child, and myths about the Mormon religion.
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Letters: Middle Children And Myths About Mormonism

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Letters: Middle Children And Myths About Mormonism

Letters: Middle Children And Myths About Mormonism

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NEAL CONAN, host: It's Wednesday and time to read from your comments.

Our conversation with Diane Ravitch and Angel Harris about closing the achievement gap between blacks, whites and Latinos in education prompted this response from Allison Collins: I've been working in the Bay Area and have experience at both the site and district level, she wrote. Administrators can reshuffle resources and create new offices and programs, which gives them the ability to say they are doing something, but no one is holding them accountable for providing the basic necessities that teachers, students and families require to succeed. Affluent families don't put up with the type of learning conditions that exist in underperforming schools and pull their kids out. What's left are schools filled with poor and immigrant families who do not have the means or education to advocate for appropriate learning conditions.

Kelly Hartman heard our discussion about the hidden advantages of middle children and sent in this comment: As a middle child, I did often get overlooked by my parents. Sometime after college, I realized that being a middle child was character building for me. I had the freedom to explore and make my way in the world. Now my family looks to me to act as the moderator in family arguments. I also enjoy a successful and adventurous life as an environmental scientist in Hawaii, 5,000 miles away from where I grew up in Michigan.

Our program about the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, specifically the many myths about Mormonism, disappointed Rebecca Norton in Oxnard, California: As an avid listener as well as a woman who was raised Mormon but left the church, your guest glossed over issues such as women being unable to hold the priesthood and was vague and dishonest about the Mormon stance on equality and gay rights. I feel let down that NPR devoted so much time to the Mormon agenda of attempting to normalize their very divisive and contemptuous behavior that is anything but Christ-like.

Craig Magnum in Provo, Utah heard the same program and wrote: The rising generation has been raised in a climate where Mormons are in the forefront. Furthermore, we have gay friends, family members, feminist mothers and friends. It's important to consider that a whole new generation, many of whom are gay friendly, is entering the ranks of orthodox and unorthodox Mormonism.

An update on the college football scandal we talked about yesterday. The NCAA ruled last night that the University of Miami football team will be allowed to play this season after a former booster said he showered some players with expensive gifts. Eight players face suspensions. A dozen must pay restitution for the gifts they took.

And a correction from that discussion yesterday. Thanks to those of you who wrote to remind us that the Fab Five played for the University of Michigan and not Michigan State, as I mistakenly said.

And finally, Nathan Zog emailed to complain about the offensive term our guest used to describe the Tea Party on the opinion page on Monday: Excuse me, it's one thing for a caller to use derogatory terms, but when your guest gets away with using this kind of term, it is completely unacceptable. All people, callers or not, should be called to task for using these kinds of terms, but not doing it with your guest is inexcusable. And Nathan's right. We should've challenged our guest, and we apologize for the omission.

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CONAN: If you have a correction, comment or question for us, the best way to reach us is by email. The address is talk@npr.org. Please let us know where you're writing from. Give us some help on how to pronounce your name. If you're on Twitter, you can follow us there, @totn.

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