No Respect For The Women On The Sidelines In TV, football sideline reporters are often women. But commentator Frank Deford wonders why they aren't up in the booth, calling the game.
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No Respect For The Women On The Sidelines

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No Respect For The Women On The Sidelines

No Respect For The Women On The Sidelines

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DAVID GREENE, Host:

This week, Frank Deford takes on some of the slow-changing attitudes in the world of sports, especially for females TV reporters. He says their role in covering pro-football especially troubles him.

FRANK DEFORD: Football season has hardly started and fans are already grousing about sideline reporters. To be sure, sideliners now exist in most all sports, and a handful of them - notably Craig Sager of Turner Broadcasting, who was apparently, nearby the day the clown died, and thus got all his clothes - are downright famous.

TV: But in sports television, sideline reporters can only go side-to-side, never up. Their place is down on the field, with the cheerleaders.

GREENE: It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene in Washington.

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep in New York.

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