Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends It's been a surprising year for the Nobel Prize. But there's no fooling commentator Dennis O'Toole — he's been plotting his picks like drafts for the Super Bowl.
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Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends

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Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends

Drafting My Fantasy Picks & Tackling Nobel Trends

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/141049513/141044464" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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GUY RAZ, Host:

You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. This year's Nobel Prize in Physics was announced today, and commentator Dennis O'Toole is thrilled about the winners. His fantasy Nobel team has never looked better.

DENNIS O: Thursday, the lit awards are going to be announced. My number one guy is Tomas Transtromer. He's Swedish, he's 80, and he is due. It's his time, and everyone knows it. America hasn't had an award since 1993, and some people say this is the year. Baloney. With all the buzz about Murakami and the Syrian poet Adonis, you got to be stoned off your bean to think Philip Roth or Joyce Carol Oates is going to get the nod. And don't say Cormac McCarthy. "Outer Dark" is sick and "Blood Meridian" is dope. But if you read "No Country for Old Men" twice, it doesn't hold up, and the Nobel committee knows it. Trust me.

B: Me and some dudes are going to tailgate outside the Kellogg School of Management before the economics prize is announced. You should totally come. My pick to click this year is N. Gregory Mankiw. They're going to say it's for his work on menu costs and price stickiness, but that's bunk. It's really so they can hand it over to someone who isn't Paul Krugman.

RAZ: And that was Dennis O'Toole, a writer and improv performer in Chicago.

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