Remembering the Tiger Death March During the Korean War, a brutal nine-day trek through the Korean countryside left nearly 100 American prisoners dead. Wayman Simpson, one of those POWs, recounts the ordeal and his treatment at the hands of a ruthless Korean officer nicknamed The Tiger.
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Remembering the Tiger Death March

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Remembering the Tiger Death March

Remembering the Tiger Death March

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Today, a POW story. Wayman Simpson served in the Korean War. He was captured in 1950 soon after the fighting began. As a POW, Simpson came under the command of a Korean officer. They nicknamed him the Tiger. He led the prisoners on a brutal nine-day trek that left nearly a hundred of them dead. The ordeal came to be known as The Tiger Death March.

WAYMAN SIMPSON: That's about the only way we can get by now, to joke about it. And a lot of them youngsters died since we come home, because they couldn't turn it loose. They wouldn't - they just dwelled on it all the time, you know? And I make a joke about it - it don't worry me. I just let it go.

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MONTAGNE: You can read more of these stories in the new StoryCorps book, "Listening is an Act of Love." Hear more at npr.org.

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