Comparing Sports, Arts Is Dangerous Business Last month, Frank Deford raised the issue of whether sports should be held in the same high regard as art on the nation's campuses. Listeners replied with rage and fury, saying that athletics already get more than their fair share of the limelight — and money.
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Comparing Sports, Arts Is Dangerous Business

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Comparing Sports, Arts Is Dangerous Business

Comparing Sports, Arts Is Dangerous Business

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Okay, every Wednesday morning, we hear from our weekly sports commentator, Frank Deford, and lately, Frank has been hearing a lot from you.

FRANK DEFORD: A few weeks ago, in this time, I offered up the thoughts of Gary Walters, the distinguished athletic director of Princeton, that sports should be held in the same high regard as art. I thought it was a rather interesting and cogent opinion for someone to posit, but in the fabled words of a longtime football announcer Keith Jackson: Whoa, Nellie. Never have I suffered such a battering. I think the nicest thing I was called in the responses that poured in, dripping with blood, was apologist dingbat.

INSKEEP: That was 75 years ago. It hasn't changed. And I'm sorry, but good people of the arts: it won't.

INSKEEP: This fact isn't changing either, Frank Deford joins us each Wednesday from member station WSHU in Fairfield, Connecticut.

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