Today, a Little Sex Ed Greetings from Bryant Park, where we're talking today to a specialist in sexual health education.
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Today, a Little Sex Ed

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Today, a Little Sex Ed

Today, a Little Sex Ed

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  • Transcript

BILL WOLFF (Announcer): From NPR News in New York, this is THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT.

LUKE BURBANK, host:

This is THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT from NPR News. We bring you the news, the information today.

A little sex ed. The daddy gives the mommy — we'll get into it in a little bit. I'm Luke Burbank.

ALISON STEWART, host:

And I'm Alison Stewart. It is Thursday, November 15.

BURBANK: Alison, big news here in New York. Alex Rodriquez and the Yankees, they may be making up.

(Soundbite of movie, "Brokeback Mountain")

Mr. JAKE GYLLENHALL (Actor): (As Jack Twist) I wish I knew how to quit you.

BURBANK: It's actually kind of a sweet story because you have these, you know, well, the first part of it is that Alex Rodriguez met with George Steinbrenner's kids in Florida recently to talk about maybe coming back and playing for the Yankees. But what I...

STEWART: Because for people who didn't follow it, he was going to walk away and look for a much bigger deal, or at least his agent was putting that out there.

BURBANK: Right, this guy Scott Boras.

Well, anyway, the thing I thought was so sweet and "Brokeback-ian" about it was the fact that both sides had been saying kind of bad stuff publicly, but they both secretly were keeping the fires of hope burning in their heart.

STEWART: It's like they said they - we'll see other people.

BURBANK: Yeah.

STEWART: But then they really wanted to date again.

BURBANK: That's right. So maybe they're getting back together. And, gosh, darn it, who says that sports doesn't have a heart anymore?

STEWART: Thos crazy kids.

BURBANK: On THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT today, we're going to talk about the writer's strike in - it's now into day 11. And it's not just the writers that are taking a hit in the old wallet, there are all kinds of other businesses in L.A. that are - I mean, not shutting down, but, like, dead: restaurants...

STEWART: Yep.

BURBANK: ...some valet car parkers. So we're going to find out what's happening in the 213.

STEWART: And the reason that we're going to talk about sex ed today is the CDC released a report saying there were 19 million cases of sexually transmitted diseases last year; about 50 percent of them: people 15 through 24, so make your kids go to sex ed class.

We're going to talk to a brave soul who is teaching sex education in the year 2007. Not an easy job.

BURBANK: Those stories plus a woman who's doing the Iditarod that's that, you know, dogsled race. She's doing it by bicycle.

We're going to have the most clicked and e-mailed story on the - stories on the Interweb.

We'll also get today's news headlines from Rachel Martin, that's in a moment.

First though, we've got a heaping helping of the BPP's big story.

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