Classical and Beyond: The Year's Best CDs Few radio personalities openly embrace as much music as WNYC's John Schaefer, longtime host of New Sounds. This year, his favorites ranged from Osvaldo Golijov to Jamie T.
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Classical and Beyond: The Year's Best CDs

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Classical and Beyond: The Year's Best CDs

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Classical and Beyond: The Year's Best CDs

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

The music is surprising and it works to the ears of John Schaefer, who hosts the program "Sound Check" on member station WNYC in New York. Oceana is his top classical pick of the year.

JOHN SCHAEFER: What's interesting about Golijov's music is, yes, it's multi cultural, it explores both music and popular music and electronic music. And there's - you know, there is no sense of this being a fusion. It's just really organic.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCHAEFER: With Golijov, it's a completely natural process.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SCHAEFER: For example, if you listen to his piece, "Night of the Flying Horses," you hear this kind of wild melodic ride that is borrowed from the Romanian gypsy band Taraf de Haidouks. And this is one of his kind of personal influences being played through the music. It's this kind of relentless musical gala. It's like that old song ghost riders in the sky come to orchestral life.

INSKEEP: To hear his top 10 favorites and to browse our comprehensive guide to the best CDs of 2007, just go to our new music Web site, npr.org/music.

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