Harvard Will Extend Aid to Middle Class Students Harvard University is significantly expanding its financial aid for middle and upper-middle class families. The changes will lower tuition bills by thousands of dollars for families earning up to $180,000 dollars a year.
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Harvard Will Extend Aid to Middle Class Students

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Harvard Will Extend Aid to Middle Class Students

Harvard Will Extend Aid to Middle Class Students

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

From member station WBUR in Boston, Curt Nickisch reports.

CURT NICKISCH: It's college application season, and Harvard's Admissions Office has been noticing a disturbing trend. Dean Bill Fitzsimmons says he was getting plenty of applications from families making less than 60 grand a year. Harvard completely covers their tuition.

M: But what we were finding is some of those families from $60,000 on up were not even applying to Harvard.

NICKISCH: The move is expected to pressure other colleges to do the same, though many admit they've been worried about this middle-class squeeze already. At Tufts University, admissions dean Lee Coffin says the bill there is closing in on 50 grand a year.

M: That cost is finally to the point where families remember buying a home and it cost less than that.

NICKISCH: For NPR News, I'm Curt Nickisch in Boston.

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