A Look Back at John Dean's Testimony In the summer of 1973, former White House Counsel John Dean testified as part of the Senate's investigation into the Watergate break-in. Weekend Edition revisits audio from Dean's testimony.
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A Look Back at John Dean's Testimony

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A Look Back at John Dean's Testimony

Law

A Look Back at John Dean's Testimony

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LIANE HANSEN, host:

As Dan mentioned, in the summer of 1973, former White House counsel John Dean testified as part of the Senate's investigation into the Watergate break-in. This is a taped except of Dean as he recalled that meeting with President Nixon.

(Soundbite of archived recording)

Mr. JOHN DEAN (Former White House Counsel): What I had hoped to do in this conversation was to have the president tell me we had to end the matter now. Accordingly, I gave considerable thought to how I would present this situation to the president and try to make as dramatic a presentation as I could to tell him how serious I thought the situation was if the cover-up continue.

I began by telling the president that there was a cancer growing on the presidency. And if the cancer was not removed, the president himself would be killed by it. I also told him that it was important that this cancer be removed immediately because it was growing more deadly every day.

HANSEN: John Dean's testimony would prove to be prophetic - perhaps even self-fulfilling. Richard Nixon resigned as president the next year.

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