Apple to Unveil New Products at Expo Fans of Apple's Mac, iPod and iPhone gather for the annual Macworld Expo. It's where the company rolls out new products. But China, it seems, isn't so dazzled by Apple's iPhone. Apple and China's largest mobile phone company call off plans to launch the iPhone.
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Apple to Unveil New Products at Expo

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Apple to Unveil New Products at Expo

Apple to Unveil New Products at Expo

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RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

Cyrus Farivar has a look at what's in store.

CYRUS FARIVAR: Jason Snell, editorial director of Macworld magazine, explains.

MONTAGNE: You'd be trading off that size and sort of accepting that there's another computer in your life and that this is sort of your main computer sidekick, and you'd take it with you when you need to go on the road, but that you know you're always going to come back to the main computer, which is where you're keeping all of your stuff. So I think that's the scenario for a flash-based laptop.

FARIVAR: For NPR News, I'm Cyrus Farivar, San Francisco.

MONTAGNE: China isn't so dazzled by Apple's iPhone, it seems. Apple and China's largest mobile phone company have called off plans to launch the iPhone there. A spokesperson for China Mobile only said her company has terminated talks with Apple, but did not say why. Experts had predicted that the two companies could end up in a standoff over issues like how to share revenues.

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