Florida Republicans Weigh Primary Options In South Florida, members of two Republican clubs chat about the candidates vying for votes in the state's winner-take-all GOP primary, scheduled for Tuesday.
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Florida Republicans Weigh Primary Options

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Florida Republicans Weigh Primary Options

Florida Republicans Weigh Primary Options

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STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

NPR's Linda Wertheimer has been talking with voters in south Florida about their choices.

LINDA WERTHEIMER: Campaigners were recruiting in the student union when we were there, including an enthusiastic Jesus Valentino(ph) for Ron Paul.

WERTHEIMER: And while I am not gay myself, I think they should be allowed to get married. But I don't think I want to spend more taxes dollars to do so.

WERTHEIMER: We met with Cuban American members of the Republican club at FIU. They are finding their choices difficult.

WERTHEIMER: Frankly, I'm terrified of Giuliani's foreign policy. Republicans are, you know, originally from their foundations, isolationists and more, you know, intra-America rather than, you know, the interventionist foreign policy - originally. And none of these candidates are so much in that mold.

WERTHEIMER: So where does that leave you, do you think?

WERTHEIMER: In a nice little state of limbo here, you know.

WERTHEIMER: Juan Carlos Robina(ph) is majoring in political science. He voted early for McCain, who proved to be the favorite with this group.

WERTHEIMER: He's always stuck to his guns, but has been willing to compromise like immigration which is a big issue for me. Maybe being Hispanic gives me a different perspective, but I see the fact that people already here, we need to realize that they're not going anywhere. We need to start getting them into the system, how - whatever word you want to use for it.

WERTHEIMER: Johnny Betancourt(ph) is a chemistry major. I asked him about Cuba.

WERTHEIMER: Coming from a more Americanized family, that actually wouldn't be a voting issue for me or probably my parents. In fact, national intervention in Cuba might be seen more like an analogue to spreading democracy in the Middle East.

WERTHEIMER: We met with members of the Broward County Republican Club at a law firm where Lee Monty(ph) was one of several who described themselves as investors. Lee Monty is for Mitt Romney.

WERTHEIMER: I like to think Mitt fits. I think his experience as a CEO is very valuable because since I'm interested in the markets and investments, every conservative thing that I want him to be he is. I mean, think he's perfect.

WERTHEIMER: Jack Fernari(ph) is a retired businessman, and he was critical.

WERTHEIMER: I find his behavior offensive. I find him calling himself a Catholic offensive. If you can't control your own family, you're not going to control this country. And if you can't control your libido, I have a problem about what kind of president you're going to make. We went through that in the '90s with Bill Clinton. I wouldn't like to see it done on our side.

WERTHEIMER: Ron Price(ph) says he is a libertarian Republican like Alan Greenspan. Price told us he is supporting McCain, but only sort of.

WERTHEIMER: I'm making a pragmatic decision. I don't think Romney's electable because of his religion. I don't think Giuliani's electable because of what you've heard said here tonight. And they're probably two of the best qualified. I would say McCain is electable and probably the only one of the candidates that has a possibility of winning in November.

WERTHEIMER: Linda Wertheimer, NPR News, Fort Lauderdale.

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