McCain Wins Schwarzenegger's Endorsement California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Thursday endorsed John McCain for the Republican presidential nomination, saying the Arizona senator has been a crusader for protecting the economy and the environment.
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McCain Wins Schwarzenegger's Endorsement

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McCain Wins Schwarzenegger's Endorsement

McCain Wins Schwarzenegger's Endorsement

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MICHELE NORRIS, host:

Not to be upstaged, there was also a big Republican political event in Los Angeles today.

(Soundbite of political speech)

Governor ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER (Republican, California): I'm endorsing Senator McCain to be the next president of the United States.

NORRIS: That, of course, is California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger during his political star power behind John McCain.

(Soundbite of political speech)

Gov. SCHWARZENEGGER: There are people out there to talk about reaching across the aisle, but he has shown the action over and over again. He's also a crusader to end wasteful spending in Washington which is so important. And he's a crusader, has a great vision in protecting the environment and also protecting simultaneously the economy.

NORRIS: Sharing the stage with John McCain and Arnold Schwarzenegger today, former New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani. He endorsed McCain yesterday after dropping out of the race. Despite those endorsements, McCain's rivals, Mitt Romney and Mike Huckabee and Ron Paul, showed no signs of backing down ahead of Super Tuesday.

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