Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog : The Salt The latest expression of over-the-top stadium food is a $25 bat-shaped corn dog packed with cheddar cheese, bacon and jalapeños. Its creator says he's game for some competition between teams.
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Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog

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Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog

Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Arizona Diamondbacks played their first home exhibition game of the year in Phoenix last night. Final score, Chicago Cubs 3, Arizona 1. But some of the best action occurred inside the team's kitchen where they prepared a giant corn dog. This requires some serious eating. Peter O'Dowd reports from member station KJZZ.

PETER O'DOWD, BYLINE: Chef Michael Snoke has created a monster.

CHEF MICHAEL SNOKE: This thing looks like a bat.

O'DOWD: Eighteen inches of meat, skewered, wrapped in corn bread, stuffed with bacon, infused with cheddar cheese and jalapenos. All that resting on a bed of fries.

SNOKE: I have created the D-Bat.

O'DOWD: Yes, the D-Bat. Twenty-five dollars and it's all yours. Snoke had an eye on the culinary competition around Major League Baseball. Last season the Texas Rangers introduced the Boom Stick Dog - two feet, 26 bucks. Snoke says his masterpiece is superior for this very simple reason.

SNOKE: Well, it's a corn dog, man. Everybody loves a corn dog.

(LAUGHTER)

BOB MCMANAMAN: It's gone. It's in my belly.

O'DOWD: Meet the first man alive who's tasted the D-Bat outside of the team's inner circle, Arizona Republic sports writer, Bob McManaman, got a sneak peek at Chase Field.

MCMANAMAN: It's going down pretty good. Yeah, so far no burps and I feel honored.

O'DOWD: I'll be honest. I did feel left out. The Dog's inventor says it's supposed to be shared, but there's something unsettling about asking another journalist for a bite of his corn dog. Anyway, Mcmanaman's having eater's remorse.

MCMANAMAN: I'm not going to touch the fries 'cause there's no way I'm going to get those down.

O'DOWD: You worried about your heart at all?

MCMANAMAN: Yeah, big time worried. I'll probably have to see a doctor tomorrow.

O'DOWD: Chef Snoke didn't bother checking the nutritional value of his corn dog. If you've got to ask, he says, you probably shouldn't eat it. But come on, you're dying to know.

SIMIN LEVINSON: All right. So let's tally this up.

O'DOWD: Nutritionist Simin Levinson's got this mean little tool on her computer. Type in a food and out comes all its dirty little secrets.

SIMIN LEVINSON: Perhaps not surprising, there is not an 18-inch corn dog currently in existence.

O'DOWD: But the traditional six-inch corn dog does exist in the database. Type it in, multiply it by three, and you get...

LEVINSON: Eight hundred and thirty-two calories.

O'DOWD: Add a few slices of bacon, yum. Three ounces of cheddar cheese, all right. Triple yum. Three servings of French fries and voila. Three thousand calories and about two days worth of sodium in one package. Regardless, Levinson says fans will eat it up.

LEVINSON: Hopefully they have a pocket full of statins and a defibrillator nearby so that in case they do go into cardiac arrest, help will be an arm's length away.

O'DOWD: For his part, the creator of the D-Bat says it's supposed to be fun, and he says if you want healthy, order a salad. For NPR News, I'm Peter O'Dowd in Phoenix.

SIMON: This is NPR News.

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