For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description As CEO of an outdoor equipment retailer, Sally Jewell was used to taking risks. Now, as the secretary of the interior, she has found there's little appetite for it in government.
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For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description

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For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description

For Interior Secretary, Getting Outdoors Is In The Job Description

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

She went from heading up REI, an outdoor equipment and clothing chain, to leading the U.S. Department of the Interior. Sally Jewell took on that job last April, when she was confirmed to replace Interior Secretary Ken Salazar. Jewell's extensive business background makes her unusual in the Obama administration and NPR's Brian Naylor, spoke with her about the transition from the corporate world to government.

BRIAN NAYLOR, BYLINE: On a recent weekday morning, Sally Jewell is getting a briefing from National Park Service archaeologists Jonathan Connolly, here in Jamestown, Virginia, the site of the first successful English colony and part of the Colonial National Historical Park. Connolly is taking her on a walking tour.

JONATHAN CONNOLLY: You're basically walking in the footsteps of people like Pocahontas and John Smith. Especially because initially they didn't have any horses to ride, so they walked where we're walking. On any given day chance are you won't find Jewell in her Washington DC office. But out in the field. It's unavoidable for someone who heads the federal agency that oversees 400 national parks and nearly 300 million acres of federal lands.

SALLY JEWELL: Yes, it's in the job description, absolutely. It's very much a part of the job. It's also a fun part of the job.

NAYLOR: She's in Jamestown to see firsthand the threat climate change poses to the nation's cultural and historic treasures. Jamestown is already low-lying and has had several feet of shoreline disappear in recent years.

JEWELL: We think about the economic impact of storms and sea level rise and those things we feel on climate change, I don't think we always think about the impact on our history and our culture and what defines us as a people and here in Jamestown all of that really comes together.

NAYLOR: Jewell is a trim 58, just as you might expect someone to be who hikes, climbs, kayaks and once ran a company selling outdoor gear. Sitting at a picnic table outside the Jamestown visitor center she says running a cabinet department is bit different.

JEWELL: There are some fundamental differences between the government sector and the private sector, that I understand much more today than I did a year ago.

NAYLOR: One of those fundamental differences Jewell says is risk-taking. In business you're often rewarded for taking the risk even if it fails. In government, she says, not so much.

JEWELL: In the government, trying new things, if you make a mistake, or you're drug in front of a Congressional hearing of some sort, people are saying, why did you take that risk? And so to convince your team that they need to think differently, that they need to take risks, is something that generally they've not ever been rewarded for.

NAYLOR: Jewell says one risk she's encouraged her department to take is an initiative with the private sector, aimed at engaging young people in the outdoors.

JEWELL: The reward is extraordinary. It's putting on the map for these young people a future - potentially future careers they'd never heard about. Places they'd never known before, places they will always be connected to because of the trees they planted, or the work they did. The Interior Department's wide ranging responsibilities include managing those 300 million acres of federal lands. The agency's Bureau of land management was involved in the highly politicized incident this spring, when it tried to remove Nevada rancher, Cliven Bundy's cattle from federal lands when he refused to pay his grazing fees. It resulted in an armed standoff between Bundy's supporters and federal law enforcement. Jewell defends the BLM's activities.

JEWELL: For someone to openly and intentionally not pay the grazing fees is -undermines the law-abiding nature of other ranchers and we can't stand for it, we won't stand for it

NAYLOR: It's not clear what the government's next move will be in the Bundy case. But Jewell says her job is to execute the department’s mission, she says her prior business experience helps her do that and that the White House welcomes hearing that point of view. Brian Naylor, NPR News.

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