British Comedians Take A 'Trip To Italy' And Make Fun Of Each Other In the sequel to The Trip, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon drive around Italy, instead of England, and engage in lively banter. The film isn't freighted with ambition, but it's extremely enjoyable.
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British Comedians Take A 'Trip To Italy' And Make Fun Of Each Other

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British Comedians Take A 'Trip To Italy' And Make Fun Of Each Other

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British Comedians Take A 'Trip To Italy' And Make Fun Of Each Other

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DAVE DAVIES, BYLINE: The largely improvised 2010 film "The Trip" featured British comic and Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon, trying to out-funny each other as they traveled around northern England. Its sequel, "The Trip To Italy," reunites Coogan and Brydon and the film's director, Michael Winterbottom. Our critic at large, John Powers, has this review.

JOHN POWERS, BYLINE: Back in the '90s, there was a Hollywood comedy - I can't remember which one, I'm afraid - that became a surprise hit. Afterwards, the movie's producer had this great line - he said, if we'd known it was going to be so popular, we would've tried to make it good.

You can sense some of that same reasoning behind the extremely enjoyable new movie, "The Trip To Italy," starring British comedy giant Steve Coogan, probably best known here for "Night At The Museum" and "Philomena," and his pal Rob Brydon, a comic and impressionist who's famous in Britain. It's the follow-up to "The Trip," a 2010 film that was basically a chopped down BBC series in which Coogan and Brydon, playing heightened versions of themselves, drove around the British countryside eating at posh restaurants, making fun of each other and trying to top on another's impressions of Sean Connery and Al Pacino.

"The Trip To Italy" is basically the same thing, but this time, Coogan, Brydon and director Michael Winterbottom knew in advance it would be released as a movie, and not just any movie, but the sequel to a movie many viewers loved. Which meant, they ought to try to make the new one better. First Coogan and Brydon discussed early on, the only sequel most people genuinely admire is "The Godfather: Part II." In many ways, "The Trip To Italy" is better than the original. It's more carefully shot, more neatly structured and certainly more picturesque. I mean, there will always be an England and all that, but if I'm looking for dazzling landscapes, I'll take Italy over England. If I want to see ruins, you can't beat Italian. And if I simply must watch food porn, which I personally find even more tiresome than actual pornography, I'd rather ogle Mediterranean shellfish than the fussy dishes at some twee English inn.

What made the first film click was Coogan and Brydon's competitive camaraderie. Back then, the more successful Coogan also seemed the lonelier and darker. Brydon came off as the nicer guy.

This flips a bit in "The Trip To Italy." Coogan is gloomier but also warmer. He's haunted by the skulls he encounters in the catacombs of Naples, whose antidote he seeks by reaching out to his son. Meanwhile Brydon seems more ambitious, seeking out Byron and Shelley's old haunts for a newspaper piece, auditioning via computer for a Michael Mann film and, though married, being tempted by a pretty young woman.

Of course, in changing things up in the sequel, you don't want to forget what people loved in the first place. With "The Trip" movies, that means leaving plenty of space for Coogan and Brydon to make fun of Michael Buble, impersonate each of the James Bonds and compare impressions in a mimic's version of "Dueling Banjos."

Here, Brydon tells Coogan to do his Michael Caine, then before Coogan can get a word in, starts doing Caine himself. Soon, Coogan joins in.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE TRIP TO ITALY")

ROB BRYDON: Did you see him in "The Dark Knight Rises"? And his voice gets even more emotional than he's ever done in the parts before (imitating Michael Caine) I don't want to bury you, Batman. I will not put you in the ground in a little box. I will not do it, Master Bruce, I will not do it.

STEVE COOGAN: (Imitating Michael Caine) I'm not going to bury another Batman.

BRYDON: Another Batman? How many Batmans has he been burying? How many are there?

(Imitating Michael Caine) I've buried 14 Batmans. I'm not going to bury another nylon cloak with pointy ears, into the box.

COOGAN: (Imitating Michael Caine) I've buried 14 Batmans. I'm not going to bury another nylon cloak with pointy ears that people wear at birthday parties.

BRYDON: (Imitating Michael Caine) With the little belt, the very wide belt that is flattering for men with an expanded girth. I won't do that to you, Master Bruce, I will not do it to you.

COOGAN: And I won't make the voice like that.

POWERS: Now, "The Trip To Italy" isn't exactly freighted with ambition. Featuring lots of shots of tasty food and nifty sweets, it's partly a huge ad for the hotels and restaurants that Coogan and Brydon visit. No matter, what I find appealing about these films is their sloping, improvisational air; their quality of catching a moment of life on the wing. As when Brydon startles Coogan with a joke so good, he can't stop himself from laughing. Watching Coogan and Brydon walk around talking, I was reminded of Richard Linklater's trilogy with Julie Delpy and Ethan Hawke, where they're constantly yakking away as they wander the European streets. And of all those great scenes from the TV show "Louie," in which Louie and a lady friend stroll the New York sidewalks, chatting.

The appeal of such moments is their human scale; two people conversing about things they care about, on actual streets, filled with actual people, lit by the actual sun. All this is the antithesis of today's exhaustedly plot-driven blockbusters, where cartoonish characters are so busy rushing around, they don't have time to talk about anything real. And where the world they inhabit was generated by a computer. The better to blow it up.

"The Trip To Italy" has no need of CGI. You see, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon are its special effects.

DAVIES: John Powers is film and TV critic for Vogue and vogue.com.

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