Is There An Echo In Here? Every answer is made up of a two-word phrase, in which the second word has three syllables, and the first word sounds like the last two of these syllables.
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Is There An Echo In Here?

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Is There An Echo In Here?

Is There An Echo In Here?

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer. And we interrupt this broadcast to bring you an important interlude of whit, wordplay and will. You must have guessed, it's time for the puzzle. Joining me now is Will Shortz. He is, of course, the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master. Good morning, Will.

WILL SHORTZ, BYLINE: Good morning, Linda.

WERTHEIMER: Now you are connecting with us from across the pond today. What takes you over there?

SHORTZ: Well, it's the World Puzzle Championship that's going on now. And it's actually an event I founded in New York in 1992. Goes to a different country every year. We're in London And I'm helping out.

WERTHEIMER: OK. Could you remind us about last week's challenge?

SHORTZ: Yes. I asked you to name a well-known movie of the past - two words, seven letters in total. I said these seven letters can be rearranged to spell the name of an animal plus the sound and makes. What animal is it? Well, the animal is a lamb. And the sound a lamb makes it baa, as B-A-A. And these seven letters can be rearranged to spell "La Bamba," which was that 1987 film starring Lou Diamond Phillips.

WERTHEIMER: Now we got about 350 correct answers this week. And our randomly chosen winner is Wendy Lin of Berkeley, California. Wendy, congratulations.

WENDY LIN: Thanks. Thanks for having me.

WERTHEIMER: Now is it true that this was a team effort?

LIN: It was. I was playing with my partner Drew. And it took us about a day or so to solve it, but we worked backwards with animals and their respective sounds. And from there it was pretty easy.

WERTHEIMER: How long have you been playing the puzzle?

LIN: On and off for about 10 years or so. I've always wanted to say from the postcard days, but I just can't say that.

(LAUGHTER)

WERTHEIMER: Wendy, are you ready to play this puzzle?

LIN: I hope so.

WERTHEIMER: So, Will, let's do it.

SHORTZ: All right, Wendy and Linda, every answer today is a made-up two-word phrase in which the second word has three syllables and the first word sounds like the last two of these syllables. For example, if I gave you the clue what the Italians smell in their capital city. You would say Roma aroma.

WERTHEIMER: Oh, deer. (Laughter).

SHORTZ: OK.

LIN: Oh, deer. OK.

SHORTZ: You never know what you're going to get here. Here's number one. Someone who says actor O'Toole's name over and over.

LIN: Peter repeater.

SHORTZ: Peter repeater is right. Try this one. A biting insect and Ecuador's capital.

LIN: Quito mosquito.

SHORTZ: There you go, Quito mosquito. A Mexican dish wrapped in a cornhusk that's made in a West African country.

LIN: OK. So tamale.

SHORTZ: Yes.

LIN: Mali tamale.

SHORTZ: A Mali tamale. Good. A breed of sheep and a large Nevada city.

LIN: Oh, that one is going to be hard.

SHORTZ: You know this. What's a large Nevada city?

LIN: I'm going to go with Reno.

SHORTZ: Yeah, Reno as it. Do you know a breed of sheep that ends in Reno?

LIN: I don't think I do.

WERTHEIMER: Merino?

SHORTZ: That might be the tough part of this. It's Reno Merino.

LIN: Merino wool. Sorry.

WERTHEIMER: Think of sweaters.

SHORTZ: There you go. All right, here is your next one. A remover of pencil marks that's in the shape of an Indy 500 car.

LIN: A racer eraser.

SHORTZ: That's it. Here's your last one. A very small cocktail with an olive.

LIN: A Teeny Martini.

SHORTZ: A Teeny Martini. Good job.

WERTHEIMER: That's the only kind I would dare to drink. Wendy, when you play our puzzle, you get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin as well as puzzle books and games. And you can read all about it at npr.org/puzzle. So, Wendy, you did a great job.

LIN: Thanks. I had some help.

WERTHEIMER: So could you tell us about your public radio station?

LIN: Sure, KQED here in Berkeley, California.

WERTHEIMER: Wendy Lin of Berkeley, California, thank you very much for planning the puzzle.

LIN: Thank you.

WERTHEIMER: OK, Will, you have the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes. It's a number puzzled by Sam Lloyd, the Great American puzzle maker whose cyclopedia puzzles was published exactly a hundred years ago. It's not a very hard puzzle. You have a target with six rings bearing the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39, 40. How can you score exactly 100 points by shooting at the target? So here again. You have a target with six rings with the numbers 16, 17, 23, 24, 39 and 40. How can you score exactly a hundred points by shooting at the target?

WERTHEIMER: I already find it impossible. However, when you have the answer, please, go to our website, npr.org/puzzle, and click on the submit your answer link. Just one entry per person, please. Our deadline for entries is Thursday, August 21 at 3 p.m. Eastern. Please include a telephone number where we can reach you at about that time. And if you are the winner, we'll give you a call, and you will get to play on the air with the puzzle editor of The New York Times and WEEKEND EDITION's puzzle master Will Shortz. Will, thank you very much.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Linda.

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