'Shadow' And 'D-12' Sing An Infectious Song About Ebola : Goats and Soda It's said to be the first song about Ebola, written by two up-and-coming Liberian music producers. The message: "Ebola is very wicked. It can kill you quick quick."
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'Shadow' And 'D-12' Sing An Infectious Song About Ebola

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'Shadow' And 'D-12' Sing An Infectious Song About Ebola

'Shadow' And 'D-12' Sing An Infectious Song About Ebola

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now in West Africa, the healthcare system has been overwhelmed by the Ebola outbreak that we've been reporting on. We are about to hear from a couple of musicians who are trying to help.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EBOLA IN TOWN")

SHADOW AND KUZZY OF 2 KINGS: (Singing) Ebola - Ebola in town. Don't touch your friend. No touching. No eating something dangerous. Ebola - Ebola in town.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

That's an awareness song being played on the radio warning people about the disease and explaining how to avoid it. It was written in by Edwin D-12 Tweh and Samuel Shadow Morgan.

GREENE: When they were working in their studio in Monrovia, the Liberian capital, back in May, no one was sure what to think about the outbreak. The government wasn't saying much and there wasn't much on the news either.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EBOLA IN TOWN")

SHADOW AND KUZZY OF 2 KINGS: (Singing) I woke up in the morning. I started hearing people dem (ph) yelling. Da (ph) what thing happen? What thing happen? Ma pekin (ph) what thing? Eh, man.

EDWIN D-12 TWEH: There was no proof that this thing was real.

SAMUEL SHADOW MORGAN: No, no, no. They didn't take it seriously at all.

TWEH: Everybody thought it was a trick of the government to try and get some money, you know.

MORGAN: We were at the studio at night thinking, you know, what do. Like can we do a song? Yeah, we can do a song.

TWEH: The best thing we can do is to make a song out of it and make the people realize this is truth.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EBOLA IN TOWN")

SHADOW AND KUZZY OF 2 KINGS: (Singing) E B O L A - Ebola - Ebola in town.

TWEH: Our other friend were like, yo, man, don't you think this is too hot, you know, it's too strong to be an awareness song? Most awareness songs are always quiet songs.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EBOLA IN TOWN")

SHADOW AND KUZZY OF 2 KINGS: (Singing) Ebola - it's dangerous.

MORGAN: The beat that we used to create the song - the beat is kind of catchy. And it's danceable, you know. Everybody wants to dance and jump up and like that so...

TWEH: We started a promotion from the street DJs, because in Liberia there are, you know, DJs all over the street. They transferred our music to phones and laptops and whatsoever. So we started a promotion from them.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EBOLA IN TOWN")

SHADOW AND KUZZY OF 2 KINGS: (Singing) I know the medicine. That distant hugging - I said distant shaking, distant kissing. Don't touch me. Ebola - Ebola in town. Don't touch your friend. No touching.

TWEH: This song became a crazy - a crazy - a crazy hit. Seriously.

MORGAN: Everywhere in the streets.

TWEH: Everywhere in the streets.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EBOLA IN TOWN")

SHADOW AND KUZZY OF 2 KINGS: (Singing) If you like the monkey, don't eat the meat. If you like the baboon, I said don't eat the meat. If you like the bat-o, don't eat the meat. Ebola.

MCEVERS: That's the song "Ebola in Town" by Liberian musicians Samuel Shadow Morgan and Edwin D-12 Tweh. We spoke to them from Minnesota, where they're visiting Shadow's brother and trying to set up a benefit concert.

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