New GoPro Camera Harness Captures Dog's-Eye View : All Tech Considered This past week, the camera maker GoPro unveiled the Fetch harness, which allows people to attach the durable cameras to their dogs. The company was inspired by some DIY efforts at pet videography.
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New GoPro Camera Harness Captures Dog's-Eye View

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New GoPro Camera Harness Captures Dog's-Eye View

New GoPro Camera Harness Captures Dog's-Eye View

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's not just big production companies making nature documentaries these days. For years now, people equipped with durable GoPro cameras have been shooting videos from the front of a surfboard or the tip of a ski and posting them online. And starting this week, GoPro made it even easier to attach the camera to your pet. NPR's Tom Dreisbach has the story.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Dude.

TOM DREISBACH, BYLINE: Here's a typical mega-popular YouTube video shot with Go-Pro cameras - guys climbing a desert cliff.

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MAN #1: This is scary man.

DREISBACH: Guy sees precarious looking zip line hundreds of feet above a canyon floor.

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MAN #1: This looks so damn scary.

DREISBACH: But this guy is not going to let this line go unzipped.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Ready?

MAN #1: Yeah, buddy.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #2: Ready, steady, spaghetti.

DREISBACH: And with the vicarious thrill of YouTube, we can all fly above the canyon together.

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MAN #1: Yeah. That was so scary.

DREISBACH: This type of video is GoPro's bread and butter. From extreme sports like dirt biking -

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #3: Oh my God.

DREISBACH: - To backcountry skiing or urban kayaking.

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UNIDENTIFIED MAN #4: Woah. That was so rowdy.

DREISBACH: What makes these videos possible are the highly durable, waterproof HD cameras and the mounts which allow people to attach those cameras to a helmet, a ski, a surfboard or a dog.

DREISBACH: The latest mount released this week is called the GoPro Fetch and it was designed by this guy.

JOSH DRUKER: My name is Josh Druker. I'm manager of the advanced mounts group here at GoPro.

DREISBACH: In fact, Druker leads a five person team with basically one job - create cool new ways to attach GoPro cameras to different stuff.

DRUKER: Yes, I have one of the best jobs in the world.

DREISBACH: The idea for a dog mount actually came from GoPro users, who were finding all sorts of ways to record a dog's eye view. So, Druker says the company did a lot of field testing to create an official harness that would fit all shapes and sizes.

DRUKER: It's not just size testing that you're looking for, it's kind of the skeletal structure underneath. Like Dobermans are very angular and narrow, whereas you take something like a Newfoundland and it's very broad and hairy.

DREISBACH: Now Josh Druker is himself not a dog owner.

DRUKER: I am not a dog owner. But I have two kids. I won't say that I put the harness on them.

DREISBACH: But you're not not saying it.

DRUKER: Yeah. There may be some therapy later where this comes up.

DREISBACH: So, kids, dogs, a really friendly cat - this new harness could fit a lot of different stuff - even a pig that surfs.

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KAI HOLT: What's your favorite surf spot? Sandy Beach?

DREISBACH: That's one of GoPro's proudest users, Kai Holt and his surfing pig, Kama.

HOLT: He doesn't even know. (Laughter).

DREISBACH: And while you might not believe there's really a pig that can stand on a surfboard in the Pacific, there it is caught on camera. Tom Dreisbach, NPR News.

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