Horton Meets A ... Who? Introducing The Kwuggerbug, From Seuss' 'Lost Stories' Seuss died in 1991, but a new collection of his lesser-known work comes out Tuesday. Horton and the Kwuggerbug and More Lost Stories includes four tales Seuss originally wrote as magazine columns.
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Horton Meets A ... Who? Introducing The Kwuggerbug, From Seuss' 'Lost Stories'

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Horton Meets A ... Who? Introducing The Kwuggerbug, From Seuss' 'Lost Stories'

Horton Meets A ... Who? Introducing The Kwuggerbug, From Seuss' 'Lost Stories'

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's report next on an author with a very wide reach.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People use them to learn and also to teach.

INSKEEP: You know his books the second they're brought in the door.

GREENE: And you would recognize his words when read on the Senate floor.

(SOUNDBITE OF SENATE HEARING)

SENATOR TED CRUZ: I would not like them here or there. I would not like them anywhere. I do not like green eggs and ham. I do not like them, Sam-I-Am.

INSKEEP: That's Sen. Ted Cruz reading another Ted - Theodore Geisel, better known as Dr. Seuss - on the Senate floor. Now, Dr. Seuss died in 1991, but a new collection called "Horton And The Kwuggerbug And More Lost Stories" comes out tomorrow. NPR's Seuss correspondent Lauren Migaki gave it a look.

LAUREN MIGAKI, BYLINE: Dr. Seuss has been charming generations of children and adults with stories like "The Cat In The Hat" since the 1950s.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE CAT AND THE HAT")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As character) Tell that hatted cat he should not be about. He should not be here when your mother is out.

MIGAKI: Over his career he wrote dozens of now classic tales, but some of his writing was were never published in book form. It just showed up in magazines. Cathy Goldsmith is in associate publishing editor at Random House.

CATHY GOLDSMITH: The four stories in this book appeared in Redbook magazine the 1950s. And Dr. Seuss actually wrote a piece once a month for Redbook.

MIGAKI: As art director in the 1970s, Goldsmith worked with Suess and remembers when he's come into the office to introduce a new book.

GOLDSMITH: He would gather everybody in a conference room. And first he would read the words to you aloud, and then he would show you the pictures. It was just - it was fabulous 'cause you would meet that book - not exactly the way a reader would meet it because it hadn't all been pulled together yet - but you had that sense of discovery.

MIGAKI: The new collection features some beloved Seuss characters and places, like Mulberry Street and a very famous elephant.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "HORTON HEARS A WHO")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As character) He was splashing, enjoying the jungle's great joys, when Horton the elephant heard a small noise.

MIGAKI: In this latest book, "Horton And The Kwuggerbug And More Lost Stories," Horton shows up again with a new cast of characters, like the Kwuggerbug, a mean-spirited little creature who bullies Horton into bringing him treats called beezlenuts.

MARGARET WILLISON: There is absolutely a kernel of the Dr. Seuss that everybody knows and loves in these stories.

MIGAKI: Margaret Willison is a librarian in Boston who specializes in children's literature. She says, because they were magazines pieces, there are some differences between these stories and classics like "Green Eggs And Ham" and "The Cat In The Hat." One major difference? Fewer of those energetic Seuss illustrations. But, she says, the lyrical language is pure Seuss.

WILLISON: Throughout, you can see him play with tenses in a way that I think is really a trademark of his. Where he talks about Horton - he climbed, and he climbed, and he clumb, and he clumb. And it's obviously a made-up tense. And so you see trademark wordplay like that all throughout these stories.

MIGAKI: Dr. Seuss's stories continue to enthrall kids today. Five-year-old Eva Steinman is is a regular at the Shaw Neighborhood Public Library in Washington, D.C. Her favorite Seuss? "Happy Birthday To You."

EVA: I like it about how it's funny. In the morning when the little boy woke up, a bird came and said, wake up. It's your birthday.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO YOU")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As character) And whether your name is Pete, Pauly or Paul, when your birthday comes around, he's in charge of it all.

MIGAKI: Lauren Migaki, NPR News.

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