Tweets In Hong Kong Put Kenny G In Jam With Communist Party : The Two-Way The saxophone superstar, hugely popular in mainland China, walked into a minefield in Hong Kong. Selfies with demonstrators sparked a response from the government — and Kenny G took down the tweets.
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Tweets In Hong Kong Put Kenny G In Jam With Communist Party

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Tweets In Hong Kong Put Kenny G In Jam With Communist Party

Tweets In Hong Kong Put Kenny G In Jam With Communist Party

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And now this. We have the story of the musician Kenny G and his very brief career of political protest. The smooth-jazz superstar tweeted a photo of himself with pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports that is only the beginning of the story.

FRANK LANGFITT, BYLINE: The first thing you need to know about Kenny G in mainland China - he's huge here.

(SOUNDBITE OF KENNY G SONG, "GOING HOME")

LANGFITT: This song, "Going Home," plays at the end of the day everywhere - malls, bullet-trains, you name it. Visiting Hong Kong this week, Kenny G popped by the protest camp and posed for photos with fans. Demonstrators were delighted, but the Communist Party hated it.

At a regular news conference, a government spokesman warned foreigners like Kenny G to, quote, "speak and act cautiously." With that - poof - Kenny G deleted the photos from his Twitter feed, said he wasn't supporting the democracy movement or defying Chinese government orders. On social media, Hong Kongers ripped him for self-censorship. April Ha supports the democracy movement and runs a boutique in Hong Kong.

APRIL HA: My personal opinion, he is a coward. He just doesn't want to be the enemy of Chinese government because that's where he's going to make big money from.

LANGFITT: Kenny G is already moving on to perform at a golf tournament gala in mainland China. Frank Langfitt, NPR News, Shanghai.

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