Is 'Womenomics' The Answer To Japan's Economic Woes? : Parallels The government has set up a female lumberjacks program, part of a wider effort to fuel growth after long-term stagnation. But critics say it does little to tackle fundamental problems.
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Is 'Womenomics' The Answer To Japan's Economic Woes?

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Is 'Womenomics' The Answer To Japan's Economic Woes?

Is 'Womenomics' The Answer To Japan's Economic Woes?

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The government of Japan is trying to revive the nation's economy. Voters will actually go to the polls this month in what's seen as a referendum on those efforts. A key part of the plan is to bring more women into the country's shrinking workforce. Japan has the lowest rate of female participation in the labor force of any developed economy. The push to change that has been dubbed Womenomics. And NPR's Anthony Kuhn is going to tell us about one woman who's benefited.

ANTHONY KUHN: Yukiko Koyama's (ph) got a deft touch with a chainsaw. She slices through big pine trees like a sushi chef cuts up a tuna roll. She's working on a hillside overlooking the city of Matsumoto, right in the middle of Japan's main island Honshu. Many of the forests here have been growing for half a century and need weeding. Koyama is 35. She used to design costumes for ballet dancers. But, she explains, she wanted to work outdoors.

YUKIKO KOYAMA: (Through translator) I've been looking for my calling - a job I can do for life. I'm the type of woman who will work even after she gets married. I want to make necessities for everyday life - not superfluous stuff.

KUHN: Koyama is one of about 3,000 women being trained and certified by the government Women's Forestry Program. It reimburses timber mills for half of the cost of employing women, including Koyama, for three years.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRIME MINISTER SHINZO ABE: (Speaking Japanese).

KUHN: Japan must change the way of thinking that tends to be male-oriented in virtually all aspects, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said in a speech this April. He pledged that 30 percent of all national government hires will be women. And women will fill 30 percent of all leadership positions by 2020. This is part of a larger effort to drag Japan's economy out of stagnation. It's been dubbed Abenomics. But Tokiko Kashiwara (ph), editor of the Tokyo-based Women's Democratic Journal, doubts it will work.

TOKIKO KASHIWARA: (Through translator) Abenomics has done nothing for women, children and low-income people. Perhaps the top 1 percent has benefited, but the majority of working women are temporary or contract workers. And for them, there's been no benefit.

KUHN: Kashiwara says that Japanese women are paid half of what men get for the same work. Finding child care and returning to their jobs after maternity leave remains difficult for many Japanese women. Abe did appoint a record-tying five female cabinet ministers. Two of them have resigned after scandals. Kashiwara says that despite the rhetoric, Abe still holds very traditional views about women in the workplace.

KASHIWARA: (Through translator) I think what Abe wants to do is to use women as part of the country's economic force by having us give birth and raise children according to Japanese women's traditional roles.

KUHN: Back in Matsumoto, a lift truck picks up the freshly cut timber. Lumberjack Yukiko Koyama takes off her hardhat and chaps, lets down her hair and breaks for lunch. Whatever problems Womenomics may be facing, Koyama says she's treated fairly and equally. She says she intends to stay in this line of work.

KOYAMA: (Through translator) After I have children, I want to stay in the forestry business. But it doesn't have to be wielding a chainsaw. It may be creating forests, planting trees or maintaining trees.

KUHN: Koyama says she loves her job. And she and her friends are thrilled that she's finally found some work she can really sink her - and her chainsaw's - teeth into. Anthony Kuhn, NPR News.

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