7 Miles Beneath The Sea's Surface: Who Goes There? Marine scientists plumbing the deepest part of the ocean sent microphones and collection probes baited with chicken to the bottom of a trench near Guam. Now they watch, wait ... and listen.
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7 Miles Beneath The Sea's Surface: Who Goes There?

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7 Miles Beneath The Sea's Surface: Who Goes There?

7 Miles Beneath The Sea's Surface: Who Goes There?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/371670931/371821144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Now to a ship full of marine scientists this week floating over the deepest part of the world, the Mariana Trench. They're sending probes down to study life in one of the most hostile environments on the planet. NPR's Christopher Joyce has been in touch with them on their research ship and has this update.

CHRISTOPHER JOYCE, BYLINE: The scientists are targeting the Sirena Deep and the Challenger Deep. They are the deepest spots - seven miles deep - in the Mariana Trench, which extends for hundreds of miles under the Pacific Ocean. Douglas Bartlett from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography is the chief scientist on board the research vessel Falkor.

DOUGLAS BARTLETT: Trenches are these inverted islands of biodiversity. And we want to know just how specialized are the organisms that live there? How abundant are they? How diverse are they? How active are they?

JOYCE: Not many living things can survive the intense near-freezing temperature at seven miles down. It's dark, and the pressure is 16,000 pounds per square inch. Consider that the air in a car tire is about 30 pounds per square inch. Bartlett says it's like being on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons. The team is dropping instrument decks to the bottom. They're about the size of a refrigerator and float back up on command. They bristle with cameras and water samplers and even traps with bait in them to attract animals.

BARTLETT: We use chicken, which can be very dramatic when you see what these scavengers do to chicken. It's incredible.

JOYCE: Scavengers at the bottom feed mostly on manna from above - the remains of dead sea life drifting down like snow. Among the bottom dwellers are shrimp-like crawlers called amphipods. Bartlett says they look tasty.

BARTLETT: But when you cut open into them, there's nothing there. There's just guts and organs and very, very little muscle.

JOYCE: The team's deep-sea probes are also collecting microorganisms, mud and seawater. This is where two huge plates of the Earth's crust meet. They suspect that some forms of life there may draw energy from chemicals seeping up from within the earth. Another task underway is an audio analysis, the first ever of what the bottom of the trench sounds like. David Barclay from Canada's Dalhousie University is in charge.

DAVID BARCLAY: One of the main goals of this cruise is to figure out do we hear any biological noise from the things that are presumably eating at the baited traps?

JOYCE: His probe already has recorded what the bottom of the trench sounds like. Here it is.

(SOUNDBITE OF BOTTOM OF THE TRENCH)

JOYCE: Yep, as you might imagine, it's pretty quiet down there. But you heard it here first - the bottom of the bottom of the Pacific. Christopher Joyce, NPR News.

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