Sending Your Holiday Mail By Way Of Rudolph, Wis. For most of the year, the tiny town of Rudolph is best known for the cheese factory off Main Street. But around Christmas, people worldwide covet a Rudolph, Wis., postmark on their cards and letters.
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Sending Your Holiday Mail By Way Of Rudolph, Wis.

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Sending Your Holiday Mail By Way Of Rudolph, Wis.

Sending Your Holiday Mail By Way Of Rudolph, Wis.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And those of you who are seeking holiday pleasure might look for it in places with seasonal names. Say Christmas, Florida, Santa Claus, Indiana, even Snowflake, Arizona. You don't even have to leave home to enjoy Rudolph, Wisconsin.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER")

GREENE: For most of the year the tiny town of Rudolph, population just a few snowflakes north of 400, is best known for the cheese factory off main street. But around Christmas people around the world covet a Rudolph, Wisconsin, postmark on their cards and letters.

BECKY TRZEBIATOWSKI: The stamp actually says, Rudolph, Wisconsin, home of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

GREENE: That's Becky Trzebiatowski. She's the town's postmaster. And its her job to rubberstamp each piece of mail with an illustration of Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer.

TRZEBIATOWSKI: People send their Christmas cards and envelopes with a note that says can you please postmark this and send it out?

GREENE: Is this is a tradition that started in 1945 and it really took off after the "Rudolph" animated television special aired in 1964. Things really got crazy this year because it is the 50th anniversary of that special.

TRZEBIATOWSKI: Normally this little post office would send out maybe two trays of mail, you know, about maybe 1,000 pieces. This year we sent out 36 trays of mail.

GREENE: That's a lot of mail. Now Rudolph, Wisconsin, was not actually named after the reindeer. The name honors Rudolph Hecox. He's the first child born in the town in the 1850s. But that has not stopped Rudolph from going head over antlers for it's red-nosed namesake.

TRZEBIATOWSKI: You know, we incorporate some fireworks and a lighted parade, and Christmas here in Rudolph is really a very delightful little town to be in.

GREENE: Delightful sure sounds like it. (Singing) Rudolph the town in Wisconsin you'll go down in history.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER")

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Singing) Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer had a very shiny nose. And if you ever...

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