The Grocery Delivery Man Who Brings Joy To A Housing Complex A San Francisco man talks about why he volunteers to deliver groceries to his elderly and disabled neighbors.
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The Grocery Delivery Man Who Brings Joy To A Housing Complex

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The Grocery Delivery Man Who Brings Joy To A Housing Complex

The Grocery Delivery Man Who Brings Joy To A Housing Complex

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It is Friday and time for StoryCorps, where people tell the stories that have shaped their lives. Fifty-five-year-old Herman Travis lives in Holly Courts, a low-income housing complex in San Francisco. Every Tuesday, Herman fills a shopping cart with groceries from a local food bank and makes home deliveries to his elderly and disabled neighbors.

HERMAN TRAVIS: When I first started doing it, people was cautious. They didn't let me in their house, period, but after they got to really know me they be happy to see me and I be happy to see them too.

GREENE: Herman Travis came to StoryCorps with his neighbor, Robert Cochran, one of the people he delivers to each week.

ROBERT COCHRAN: You can hear the shopping cart coming down the sidewalk. My wife will say, Bobby, here come Herman (laugher). The amazing thing is how he load that shopping cart up and push it up that hill.

TRAVIS: I got it all down pat.

COCHRAN: But you always do it with a smile. I sometimes sit back and watch you and I seen the way that you handle yourself with the residents. They know they're treated with respect when they see you coming. And there are people in other complex that been trying to steal Herman for years, to pay him to come and deliver their food for them.

TRAVIS: Oh, yeah.

COCHRAN: We know (laughter), but we're a close-knit bunch. You know, it's the little thing that you do day in and day out that I admired for the last eight years. I don't think that you can find a better person to be friend with. Thank you.

TRAVIS: Doing something that people really need and that make me feel really good. So as long as I got breath in my body I'm going to continue doing it. I sleep good at night.

GREENE: That's Herman Travis with his friend and neighbor, Robert Cochran, at StoryCorps in San Francisco. Their interview will be archived at the Library of Congress and you can get the podcast on iTunes and npr.org.

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