For An Injured Son, Caring Mom Is 'The Picture Of Unconditional Love' In this week's StoryCorps, we hear from a man who was badly injured in a car accident. He can't walk or talk and communicates through a computerized voice. He thanks his mother for taking care of him.
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For An Injured Son, Caring Mom Is 'The Picture Of Unconditional Love'

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For An Injured Son, Caring Mom Is 'The Picture Of Unconditional Love'

For An Injured Son, Caring Mom Is 'The Picture Of Unconditional Love'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/384212826/384223132" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Friday means it is time for StoryCorps. And today, we hear from a man in Texas who speaks through a computer.

SEAN CARTER: Hi, my name is Sean Carter. I am here with my mom, Jenny Carter.

GREENE: Ten years ago, Sean was a college student in Wichita Falls, Texas. One night, he was riding in a car with a friend who had been drinking. They crashed, and Sean was left with a traumatic brain injury. He's been unable to walk or talk since. His mom, Jenny, has been his caretaker. And they spoke at StoryCorps in Dallas.

S. CARTER: What were you feeling when you found out I had been in a car wreck?

JENNY CARTER: I was devastated. It was just so hard seeing your child's lifeless body in a bed for so long. You couldn't do anything for two years. But I think - you know, we've accomplished quite a bit together in the last 10 years.

S. CARTER: I'm certainly not ready to do everything alone, but I do so much for myself now.

J. CARTER: It's kind of hard living with your mom 24/7 when you're 32 years old.

S. CARTER: [Bleep] yeah.

J. CARTER: (Laughter).

What's been the hardest moment for you?

S. CARTER: I'm not sure I could even choose one particular thing. I certainly miss having friends. I miss being in love. I would be willing to bet I would've been married by now with kids, like my two brothers have.

J. CARTER: As your mom, Sean, that's probably one of the hardest things for me is the pain that I have because it hasn't happened for you.

If this was to be our last conversation, what would you say to me?

S. CARTER: Let me stop you right there. I know you will be here for many years to come, but I want you to know how thankful I am for what you have done for me. You gave up your life to give me a life.

J. CARTER: Yeah, but it's OK. Time's really the valuable commodity that we have, and if you can share that time with somebody else, that's probably the most important thing you can do for someone. It's the only thing that matters.

S. CARTER: I don't say this enough. I admire your commitment to be the best [bleep] mom you can be, and you do a [bleep] fine job. You are the picture of unconditional love. I love you beyond the moon and back.

J. CARTER: Thank you, son.

GREENE: That's Jenny Carter with her son Sean at StoryCorps in Dallas. This conversation will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. And the StoryCorps podcast is on iTunes and at npr.org.

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