In Nepal, Efforts Underway To Salvage Ancient Sites Damaged By Quake At least 70 ancient sites in the Kathmandu Valley were damaged or destroyed in last month's quake. Archaeologists and others are trying to protect and recover as much as they can, as fast as possible.
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In Nepal, Efforts Underway To Salvage Ancient Sites Damaged By Quake

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In Nepal, Efforts Underway To Salvage Ancient Sites Damaged By Quake

In Nepal, Efforts Underway To Salvage Ancient Sites Damaged By Quake

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

The government in Nepal is battling on two fronts after the massive earthquake there last weekend - the first, to provide food, shelter and medical help to the millions of people affected - the second, to salvage what is left of its cultural treasures. The government says at least 70 ancient, sacred sites in the Kathmandu Valley alone have been severely damaged or destroyed. One of the largest of these is a complex of temples sacred to both Hindus and Buddhists that sits high on a mountaintop on the outskirts of the capital. NPR's Kirk Siegler reports on volunteers and archaeologists who are digging through the rubble, trying to salvage as many artifacts as they can.

KIRK SIEGLER, BYLINE: Swayambhunath - or the Monkey Temple, as its named locally for its holy, furry dwellers that swing from the rosewood trees - is one of the oldest and most sacred sites in the Kathmandu Valley. As it happens, it was also one of the most damaged by the quake.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOVELING)

SIEGLER: Nepali police soldiers shovel broken bricks and sand into garbage baskets. They're much more cautious cleaning up here than at many other devastated sites. There's a chance they could still find artifacts in this rubble.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: (Foreign language spoken).

SIEGLER: Volunteers stand precariously atop a two-story-high pile of crumbled bricks, scouring it for treasures. A temple right by them has big cracks and looks like it could topple and crush them any minute. This is dangerous, but important work, says Suresh Shrestha, who's peeled off his dust mask and is taking a break in the shade. He's undersecretary for Nepal's Department of Archaeology.

SURESH SHRESTHA: Actually, there are so many artifacts because in Hinduism and Buddhism, there are lots and lots of gods and goddesses.

SIEGLER: With help from the U.N., every artifact here that's found intact from now on is inventoried and stored in a secure place to protect from looters.

CHRISTIAN MANHART: The oldest structure here is from fifth century A.D., here in Swayambhunath.

SIEGLER: This is UNESCO's in-country representative for Nepal, Christian Manhart.

MANHART: I haven't even looked at some. If you want to come with me, let's have a look at it.

SIEGLER: It turns out that Buddhist monument was sitting in the middle of this courtyard out in the open when the quake hit.

MANHART: So it's this stupa you see here - you know, the first one on the right side, with the - with the four Buddha heads - and it is intact. We are lucky.

SIEGLER: Manhart says it's not clear how much of this Swayambhunath complex, with its two mountaintops of temples and monasteries, can be restored.

MANHART: It's difficult now to say. But if you want my personal opinion, I'm rather optimistic because we have all these architectural features, like sculptures, carved wooden beams, cornerstones, which can be reused for construction because...

SIEGLER: Remarkably, the most sacred rituals are continuing...

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SIEGLER: ...Including worship five times a day. The priests and their families here are now homeless with nowhere else to go.

ASHOK BUDDHACHARYA: We have very big problem, but you do not stop the praying. Ritual praying is continuing.

SIEGLER: Ashok Buddhacharya, one of the priests, is sitting on a mat underneath a large blue tarp where he and his wife and children and other families are cooking and sleeping. He says his family's roots trace back to fifth century at this temple. They're devastated and sad.

BUDDHACHARYA: These are historical - more than 1,000 years old. The stupas, the metal things, statues are - we cannot make a repeat, you see.

SIEGLER: We can't just rebuild them, he says. They're lost. That's why archaeologists feel a sense of urgency here and at other sites as they work around the clock to recover what they can. Kirk Siegler, NPR News, Kathmandu.

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