Long-Term Depression May Boost Stroke Risk Long After Mood Improves : Shots - Health News Even after the psychological pain is effectively treated, damage from long years of depression may linger. It seems to double the risk of stroke among adults over age 50, research suggests.
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Long-Term Depression May Boost Stroke Risk Long After Mood Improves

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Long-Term Depression May Boost Stroke Risk Long After Mood Improves

Long-Term Depression May Boost Stroke Risk Long After Mood Improves

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And next we have an important reminder of how your mental health can affect your physical health. We knew there's a link between depression and the risk of stroke. Now research suggests that the risk of a stroke outlasts your depression. Even after you're feeling better, the risk stays high. That is the finding of the journal of the American Heart Association. NPR's Patti Neighmond reports.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: Researchers were surprised by the findings. Epidemiologist Maria Glymour headed the study at Harvard's T. H. Chan School of Public Health.

MARIA GLYMOUR: We thought that once people's depressive systems got better, their stroke risk would go back down to the same as somebody who'd never been depressed.

NEIGHMOND: But that's not what Glymour found.

GLYMOUR: We found that people who had depressive symptoms but then had gotten better and their depression had gone away still had an increased risk of stroke of 66 percent.

NEIGHMOND: Now, this was the case up to two years after people's depression went away. To figure out if people were depressed in the first place, researchers analyzed how more than 16,000 adults over 50 answered questions like these.

GLYMOUR: If during the past week they had often felt depressed or felt that everything they did was an effort, whether they had had restless sleep, whether they couldn't get going, they felt lonely, whether they enjoyed life, whether they felt sad.

NEIGHMOND: And if people said yes to three or more questions, they were considered depressed. Now, Glymour expected people with chronic depression to have a higher risk of stroke, and they did - more than double the risk of those who weren't depressed. But here's the mystery - scientists don't know how depression is linked to stroke. Glymour says it could have something to do with the body's physical reaction to depression.

GLYMOUR: Changes in immune function, changes in inflammatory response, changes the nervous system functioning, and all of these might influence hypertension, blood pressure, cortisol levels and thereby increase your risk of stroke.

NEIGHMOND: Or it could be that depression affects other important behaviors.

GLYMOUR: Because it's changing how people behave and making it harder to behave in healthy ways.

NEIGHMOND: For example, she says, depression may make it hard to get up and exercise. It may make people more likely to smoke cigarettes or drink too much, and it may make it difficult to manage other stroke risk factors like hypertension or diabetes. Glymour says the findings of her study suggest the negative health effects of depression can be cumulative over time, which is why she says it's so important to treat depression as soon as possible. Dr. Renee Binder with the American Psychiatric Association couldn't agree more.

RENEE BINDER: There is no health without mental health. When people come to their primary care physician, they should be screened for depression, for anxiety.

NEIGHMOND: Answers to just a few questions such as whether patients feel sad many days of the week or get pleasure from everyday activities can be clear warning signs that more extensive screening is needed and perhaps referral to an a mental health specialist. The good news, says Binder, depression is extremely treatable.

BINDER: When people are depressed and, depending on their particular symptoms, they are given a short course of psychotherapy or a short course of medications, they can do very, very well.

NEIGHMOND: And in fact, she says, up to 90 percent of patients with depression get better with treatment. In her study, researcher Maria Glymour found people recently diagnosed recently with depression were not at a higher risk of stroke, so early diagnosis and treatment, she says, can make all the difference in decreasing the risk of stroke. Patti Neighmond, NPR News.

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