Cyber Archaeologists Rebuild Destroyed Artifacts : All Tech Considered Hundreds of ancient artifacts have been damaged or destroyed during violence in the Middle East. Researchers are using the power of crowdsourcing and 3-D imaging to re-create the ancient artifacts.
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Cyber Archaeologists Rebuild Destroyed Artifacts

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Cyber Archaeologists Rebuild Destroyed Artifacts

Cyber Archaeologists Rebuild Destroyed Artifacts

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now to a story that's really about the past and the future colliding. Hundreds of ancient artifacts and historic sites have been ruined during the violence in the Middle East. The U.N. reports some 200 sites have been damaged or destroyed by the self-proclaimed Islamic State alone. Well, now cyber-archaeologists are working to put the pieces back together - digitally, at least - by using a process called photogrammetry.

CHANCE COUGHENOUR: 3-D reconstruction from images, 3-D modeling from images.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

That's a Chance Coughenour. He's part of the Project Mosul - a team of volunteers working to digitally reconstruct ancient artifacts by using photographs and even film taken by tourists. Anyone can upload images to the project's website where the team relies on crowdsourcing to sort them out.

GREENE: Next, the images are run through software.

COUGHENOUR: The computer processes it, aligns it in the same way that your two eyes are looking at one object, and you can detect the depth. So it detects the points of the object in the images, and then it produces a dense point cloud, so then a 3-D model - what you would call a 3-D mesh with the texture of the surface.

GREENE: And the final result is a digital three-dimensional rendering of the object.

COUGHENOUR: As best as you can produce with the images available. That's to say that as we are given more images, the model will become better over time. So we're working with what we have at this moment, but the more that we have, the better the models.

GREENE: Coughenour says the goal is to one day offer full virtual reconstructions of museums and even historic sites. The team has already received over 700 photos and is hard at work reconstructing artifacts from Egypt, Nepal and Iraq.

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