The Man Before The Guitar: Remembering Les Paul At 100 Paul is mostly remembered for his musical innovations, especially the instrument that bears his name. But he was also an accomplished jazz musician who kept performing even in his final years.
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The Man Before The Guitar: Remembering Les Paul At 100

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The Man Before The Guitar: Remembering Les Paul At 100

The Man Before The Guitar: Remembering Les Paul At 100

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Les Paul is mostly remembered for his musical innovations, especially the electric guitar that bears his name. But he was also an accomplished jazz guitarist, and as NPR's Joel Rose reports, on what would've been Paul's 100th birthday, he was never happier than when he was playing for a live audience.

JOEL ROSE, BYLINE: Say the name Les Paul to anybody born after 1960 and they'll probably think you're talking about an electric guitar. Paul himself knew this, says his friend, Lou Pallo.

LOU PALLO: In fact, he would go on some jobs and say, see I'm not a guitar. (Laughter). Here I am. I'm Les Paul.

ROSE: Pallo is a singer and guitarist who shared the stage with Les Paul every Monday night for close to three decades. They played a bit of everything Paul had done over his career, including country, pop and jazz.

PALLO: He loved playing the melody, and that is very hard to do. A lot of people think it's easy. It's not easy, with feeling, like Les did. He played "Over The Rainbow" so pretty. I never heard anyone play it like Les played it.

(SOUNDBITE OF LES PAUL SONG, "OVER THE RAINBOW")

ROSE: Lester William Polsfuss was born in Waukesha, Wis. He got his start playing and singing country music on the radio in the morning and jazz at night.

(SOUNDBITE OF LES PAUL SONG)

ROSE: Paul first heard jazz on the radio in Waukesha, as he told NPR in 1996.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

LES PAUL: When I heard Art Tatum, when I heard Fats Waller, I knew that jazz is where I'd like to go. And you know, I dropped from $1,000 a week as a country singer down to $5 a week as a jazz player. And I said, there's something wrong. And that's when I formed the Les Paul Trio. And then I was down the middle of the road.

(SOUNDBITE OF LES PAUL TRIO SONG)

ROSE: By the mid-1940s, Paul was in Los Angeles and he was invited to play in the landmark Jazz at the Philharmonic concert series, where he jammed with pianist Nat King Cole.

Phil Schaap is a jazz radio host and historian.

PHIL SCHAAP: They talked back and forth at each other, and it just knocks out the musicians on stage and the audience. And it has been the primary illustration of Les Paul, the jazz artist, ever since.

(SOUNDBITE OF LES PAUL AND NAT KING COLE SONG)

ROSE: Jazz was only one of Les Paul's interests. He played with some of the biggest pop acts of the 1940s, including Bing Crosby and The Andrews Sisters. But his solo breakthrough came thanks to recording techniques he developed in his garage.

(SOUNDBITE OF LES PAUL SONG)

ROSE: Paul used acetate discs and later, reel-to-reel tape machines, to record himself playing multiple parts. And he sped-up those recordings to make it sound like he was playing even faster than he could in real life.

PAT MARTINO: He was an incredible effects engineer.

ROSE: Pat Martino met Les Paul in the late 1950s. Today, Martino is a master jazz guitarist himself. He was a 12-year-old prodigy from Philadelphia when his parents took him to see Paul for the first time. A few years later, Martino went to stay with Les Paul at his home in New Jersey for six months.

MARTINO: He was an inventor, and of course he applied that in such a way that it enhanced the effect that he had as a guitarist in terms of his ability and his clarity with precision.

(SOUNDBITE OF LES PAUL SONG)

ROSE: Just as Les Paul's solo career was taking off, he was badly injured in a car accident in 1948. Doctors told him they couldn't rebuild his right elbow, so Paul told them to fuse the elbow at a 90-degree angle so that he could keep playing guitar. After the accident, Paul had his biggest hits with his wife, singer Mary Ford.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "HOW HIGH THE MOON")

MARY FORD: (Singing) Somewhere there's music, faint the tune. Somewhere there's heaven, high how the moon.

ROSE: It was in the early 1950s that Paul helped design the solid-body electric guitar that bears his name. It's still a favorite with rock players. But the rise of rock 'n' roll took a toll on Les Paul the musician. He retired from performing in 1965, but he missed it. So in the 1980s, he got a weekly gig at a small nightclub in Manhattan.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

PAUL: All my life, I was torn between being commercial and playing jazz. If you play jazz, you don't eat. You don't sell your records and the air gets thin. Today I say, I don't care about money. I don't care about anything. I just go in and play. Now I can play jazz.

ROSE: Les Paul's band mate who did those weekly gigs was singer and guitarist, Lou Pallo. He says right up to the end, Paul was constantly tweaking the band's sound.

PALLO: You know Lou, last week, your guitar has sounded a little on a high side - might cut down the treble. He was a perfectionist, fussing with that sound, all the way up to 94 years old.

ROSE: By then arthritis prevented Paul from playing with blazing the speed he had shown earlier in his career, but it didn't keep him off the stage, as he told NPR in 2005.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

PAUL: Every setback might be the very thing that makes you carry on and fight all the harder and become that much better. And I probably will play till I fall over, and that's the end.

ROSE: Les Paul played every Monday night until just a few months before his death in 2009. Joel Rose, NPR News, New York.

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