Through Soccer, Teen Migrants Rebuild Lives And Get Chance To Meet Pope During his U.S. visit in September, the pope is set to meet with unaccompanied minors from Central America who have formed a youth soccer team co-sponsored by New York's Catholic Charities.
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Through Soccer, Teen Migrants Rebuild Lives And Get Chance To Meet Pope

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Through Soccer, Teen Migrants Rebuild Lives And Get Chance To Meet Pope

Through Soccer, Teen Migrants Rebuild Lives And Get Chance To Meet Pope

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Soccer is the favorite sport of Pope Francis. So when the Pope visits the United States next month, he is said to meet with some unique soccer players in New York City.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

They're migrant teenagers in a program cosponsored by New York's Catholic Charities. Many of them fled Central America and entered the U.S. illegally, and they are now waiting for court hearings to determine whether they can stay in the U.S. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang caught up with some of them on the soccer pitch.

HANSI LO WANG, BYLINE: Saturday afternoon on the field is a weekly ritual for 19-year-old Carlos Alfaro.

CARLOS ALFARO: I play soccer all my life. Soccer is my passion, so I play soccer when I can.

WANG: And so do about three dozen of his teammates. Some are among the tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors from Central America who for now are living with relatives in the U.S. And a few of them are expected to meet Pope Francis, who will spend some time with immigrants in New York after speaking at the UN and the 9/11 Memorial. For Carlos Alfaro, the chance meet the Pope is an unexpected opportunity after leaving his family in Honduras two years ago for the U.S.

ALFARO: Here, I can find opportunity - I can work. Get the college - start my life like everybody wants.

ELVIS GARCIA CALLEJAS: (Speaking Spanish).

WANG: Elvis Garcia Callejas helps coach the team on the weekends. During the week, he's a migration counselor at the Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, one of the sponsors of the soccer program.

CALLEJAS: Soccer, in a way, makes them forget everything. Sometimes you see them in immigration court really worried, and then you come see them play soccer. They are kids again.

WANG: Garcia Callejas was once a 15-year-old kid himself from Honduras. Before he became a U.S. citizen, he said he hitchhiked and rode on tops of trains alone to escape violence and find better opportunities - a lot like this younger generation of unaccompanied minors.

CALLEJAS: A lot of them have come to the U.S. looking for a safe place. A lot of them have come because they want to reunify with their parents. A lot of them came because they were too poor in their country.

WANG: But here in the South Bronx, at least for a few hours in the fields across from Yankee Stadium, the drama is focused on the field or on the sidelines where you can hear the second stringers groan and stomp, waiting for their turn. Garcia Callejas says some of his players have used their down time to prep for the Pope.

CALLEJAS: They have been looking up into San Lorenzo, which is the soccer team that the Pope loves.

WANG: It's his favorite team?

CALLEJAS: Yeah, in Argentina.

WANG: 18-year-old Ariel Mejia watched Pope Francis downplaying his soccer skills in a recent interview with TyC Sports of Argentina. The Pope said he's a terrible player.

(SOUNDBITE OF INTERVIEW)

POPE FRANCIS: (Foreign language spoken).

ARIEL MEJIA: Oh yeah, I watched this video. Yeah, I watched the video. He said he's terrible. (Laughter).

WANG: Still, 16-year-old Cristhian Contreras says he's looking forward to meeting him.

CRISTHIAN CONTRERAS: (Speaking Spanish).

WANG: "Because," he says in Spanish, "the Pope's from the Americas and he speaks Spanish." But that's not all this pope and these teenagers on the soccer field share.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Cheering).

WANG: There's also that passion for the game. Hansi Lo Wang, NPR News.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (Chanting) New York City, New York City.

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