'Coming Home' To Heartache And Hope NPR film critic Bob Mondello reviews a new drama from China by director Zhang Yimou about a Cultural Revolution detainee who returns to a wife who does not recognize him.
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'Coming Home' To Heartache And Hope

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'Coming Home' To Heartache And Hope

Review

Movie Reviews

'Coming Home' To Heartache And Hope

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

China's cultural revolution was a period of political turmoil launched by Chairman Mao in 1966, a dark decade that many in Chinese society would prefer to forget. Our film critic, Bob Mondello, says that may explain why a movie set in that time, a story of amnesia, has been such a success in China. That movie "Coming Home" by director Zhang Yimou is now playing in the U.S.

BOB MONDELLO, BYLINE: The film opens with a Cold War propaganda vignette - a military ballet, young Chinese girls dressed as soldiers pirouetting with prop guns. One of the dancers is the ambitious daughter of Yanshi, a disgraced professor who, she will soon learn, has escaped from a reeducation camp. Hoping to advance her ballet prospects, she informs on her parents to the authorities, tells the police that her mother, Wanyu, plans a secret rendezvous with Yanshi at the train station, the crowded train station where the only way a hidden Yanshi can find his wife is to come out into the open. Though certain he'll be caught, he steps from the shadows, waves his arms and shouts his wife's name.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COMING HOME")

DAOMING CHEN: (As Lu Yanshi) Wanyu, Wanyu.

MONDELLO: Wanyu, standing high on a platform, sees him, and at that same moment, sees soldiers coming for him. So she screams at him to run...

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COMING HOME")

LI GONG: (As Feng Wanyu, speaking Mandarin).

MONDELLO: ...To run away. Instead, he runs toward his wife. And seeing that he'll be caught, she runs toward him as soldiers close in on them both.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COMING HOME")

UNIDENTIFIED ACTOR: (As Character, speaking Mandarin).

MONDELLO: In many films, this scene would be the climactic finale. Here, it just sets up the real story, the coming home of the title years later after the excesses of the cultural revolution have brought about its end. Yanshi, now declared rehabilitated, returns to his family, which should be a happy moment but is instead a puzzlement.

That day at the train station, his wife suffered a head injury and has been left with an intense desire to see her husband and an inability to recognize him when she does. What she sees when Yanshi shows up is a man trying to take her beloved husband's place.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COMING HOME")

GONG: (As Feng Wanyu, speaking Mandarin).

MONDELLO: "Nobody wants to see you," he's told. Please leave. To which he replies, what's happening?

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "COMING HOME")

GONG: (As Feng Wanyu, speaking Mandarin).

CHEN: (As Lu Yanshi, speaking Mandarin).

MONDELLO: Now, there are two ways to understand the rest of "Coming Home," a standoff in which he struggles to reawaken his wife's memory as she struggles to remain faithful to the husband she thinks she remembers.

One is as a six-hankie weepy of the sort that, say, Nicholas Sparks churns out regularly. The other is as a broader social commentary about a time that required resilience and internal strength in China. Director Zhang Yimou, who has said in interviews that the suffering and turmoil of the cultural revolution was a formative period for him, appears happy to have it both ways.

He's cast as the wife, the actress who has been his muse in eight films now, Gong Li. And as her eyes glisten with both pain and hope in a gray world of muted emotions, her amnesia comes to seem a sort of collective denial in coming home, a survival strategy for those who can only soldier on after losses too painful to recall. I'm Bob Mondello.

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