'Nation's T. Rex' Strikes A Rapacious Pose Drills and screws would damage the frail, 65.5 million-year-old bones of the Smithsonian's 38-foot-long Tyrannosaurus rex. So how do you make it stand? Blacksmiths in Canada are working their magic.
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'Nation's T. Rex' Strikes A Rapacious Pose

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'Nation's T. Rex' Strikes A Rapacious Pose

'Nation's T. Rex' Strikes A Rapacious Pose

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ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Giant dinosaurs draw giant crowds at museums. Exhibitors like to make sure they are anatomically correct, but what usually is not real are the bones. They're synthetic casts. This week, the Smithsonian Institution is finishing a rare mounting of a Tyrannosaurus rex with real bones. NPR's Christopher Joyce has been following the dinosaur on its journey to the museum and reports on its first days on its feet.

CHRISTOPHER JOYCE, BYLINE: The National Museum of Natural History in Washington has coveted a real T-rex for decades. It's never had one. Last year, it got one from Montana's Museum of the Rockies. Technicians repaired and digitally scanned the bones and then sent them to Canada to be mounted. And now the T-rex is at last standing up in the Canadian workshop. That's where Smithsonian dino curator Matthew Carrano got his first look at the assembled 38-foot beast.

MATTHEW CARRANO: It's pretty spectacular. First of all, it's an actual real Tyrannosaurus rex fully mounted and standing in front of me.

JOYCE: Second because of what the carnivore is doing. At its feet is a fossilized Triceratops. That's the plant-eating horned dinosaur known for a bony fringe around the back of its neck that looks like some kind of frilly Elizabethan collar.

CARRANO: And the T-rex is biting that, and it's in the process of levering off the skull from the rest of the body of the Triceratops. So it has one foot on the ribcage and one foot on the ground offering a little bit of leverage for that.

JOYCE: The Smithsonian knows its audience.

CARRANO: It's got high drama. I think it's got the kinds of things that, you know, every kid dreams about when they think about T-rex.

JOYCE: That said, Carrano points out that the pose is also a nod to the scientific debate over whether T-rex was primarily a scavenger of dead animals or a full-time predator. It's not clear from this bloody tableaux whether the Triceratops is already dead or is being killed. Carrano's own opinion on the T-rex's preference...

CARRANO: Carnivores don't turn down meals.

JOYCE: Whether they're alive and kicking or already dead. Getting these fossilized bones into an anatomically correct position while creating an exciting pose was tricky. Peter May, the head of Research Casting International, says his team spent months working with Smithsonian scientists to do that. One obstacle was, most of these are real bones, not synthetic casts, so technicians could not drill into them and screw them together. Instead, they built a tall metal frame festooned with form-fitting metal cradles to hold the bones.

PETER MAY: It looks sort of like antlers. We had blacksmiths on staff, and they're hand-forged to fit the bone perfectly.

JOYCE: The cradles hold more than 150 major bones of the skeleton in their proper place suspended on the frame. May says his company has mounted several T-rexs before. Each has its own story and character, and this one is no exception. A Montana ranching family found it in 1988. Scientists recovered 85 percent of its original bones. It was one of the most complete T-rexs ever found at the time, and May says one part of the skeleton was a real revelation.

MAY: It was the first T-rex discovered with a forelimb. And before that, it was all speculation on how big the forelimb was.

JOYCE: Turned out those forelimbs - the animal's arms - were only about three feet long. Scientists are still puzzled by what the dinosaur did with them. The public will have to wait a bit to see this. The T-rex will be mounted at the museum's renovated dinosaur hall in 2019. Christopher Joyce, NPR News.

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