30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout : Shots - Health News Once an obscure hub of specialists, the yearly gathering of the Society for Neuroscience now draws some of the biggest and brightest from other fields too, seeking answers to brain and body secrets.
NPR logo

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/450847067/450937923" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/450847067/450937923" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A convention center in Chicago became the epicenter of brain science this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

KARA FURMAN: It's amazing. I'm a bit overwhelmed. There are 30,000 people here.

CORNISH: Kara Furman is a graduate student from Yale. This is her first Society for Neuroscience meeting. NPR's Jon Hamilton was there too.

JON HAMILTON, BYLINE: Furman was one of several hundred neuroscientists I found outside the convention center one afternoon waiting for shuttle busses. She was pondering a talk she'd heard that morning, one that only a brain scientist could appreciate.

FURMAN: Using MRI techniques to access dopamine release at the molecular level - that was pretty mind blowing.

HAMILTON: Mind-blowing brain science is why researchers from around the world attend what's known simply as the Neuro Meeting. The next person I talked to was...

SRINIVAS BHARATH: Yeah. Srinivas Bharath. I am from India.

HAMILTON: You're going to have to spell that.

BHARATH: (Laughter).

HAMILTON: Bharath had come to present his research on traumatic brain injury. He also wanted to soak up as much neuroscience as he could, and there were thousands of presentations to choose from.

BHARATH: I prepared an itinerary based on my interests, and that ran into 20 pages.

HAMILTON: Many scientists carried mailing tubes containing poster presentations of their research. They unfurled their charts and graphs at precise times in a vast hall that looked like the world's largest science fair. Julie Douville had come from Charles River Laboratories in Montreal.

JULIE DOUVILLE: My poster is tomorrow.

HAMILTON: What's it on?

DOUVILLE: It's on targeted intracerebral administration in the cynomolgus monkey.

HAMILTON: OK.

Yeah. That one baffled me. Of course, the Neuro Meeting didn't always attract 30,000 scientists. To learn about its history, I left the buses and entered the convention center to find Jacqueline McGinty from the Medical University of South Carolina. At McGinty's first Neuro Meeting in 1978, there were only about 5,000 people.

JACQUELINE MCGINTY: Looking back, it was really quite small, and the population in neuroscience at the time was pretty small.

HAMILTON: But that changed quickly during the 1980s.

MCGINTY: More and more programs were calling themselves neuroscience, and this became the center and the major meeting for everyone to convene over the years.

HAMILTON: Also, brain science began to interest researchers from other fields - for example, McGinty says, people who study digestive diseases.

MCGINTY: Now they're interested in the entire physiology that includes the brain and food addiction as well as studies, you know, below the neck.

HAMILTON: One media event at the Meeting featured scientists from seven different disciplines at the National Institutes of Health. So I asked them why this meeting has become such a big deal. Neil Buckholtz of the National Institute on Aging thinks it's because brain research isn't just about rats and mice anymore.

NEIL BUCKHOLTZ: Now the animal of choice is really the human in many of the studies that we're doing.

HAMILTON: Which makes the results a lot more compelling. Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse, says it's because of the tools scientists have now, like imaging technologies.

NORA VOLKOW: Because they really enable us to look at the living human brain to try to explore, actually, the circuitry and networks.

HAMILTON: Walter Koroshetz, who directs the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, had a more pragmatic explanation.

WALTER KOROSHETZ: The brain acts on money (laughter), and neuroscience is now the largest bucket of funding at NIH.

HAMILTON: It now gets more money than cancer. Of course, meetings like this aren't just about science. At a hotel bar, Takashi Kitamura from MIT is having a beer with some friends. He says things could go pretty late.

TAKASHI KITAMURA: Always, we have some social party, then they cannot wake up.

HAMILTON: It's a rare break for Kitamura, who didn't get where he is by being a party animal. And once the socializing and poster sessions are over, Kitamura will get back to the painstaking task of brain science. He works for Susumu Tonegawa, a Nobel Prize winner who is studying the basis of memory. Jon Hamilton, NPR News, Chicago.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.