Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus : The Salt Rinderpest, or cattle plague, was declared eradicated in 2011. But many research institutes still have samples of the rinderpest virus in storage. Disease experts want those samples destroyed.
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Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus

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Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus

Rounding Up The Last Of A Deadly Cattle Virus

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There are two diseases humans have wiped from the face of the Earth. One is small pox. The other you may not have heard of. It's a cattle disease declared eradicated four years ago. But many scientific institutes still keep samples of the virus in storage. Now a group of animal health experts is calling for most of those samples to be destroyed. NPR's Dan Charles reports.

DAN CHARLES, BYLINE: Rinderpest - even the name sounds scary.

KEITH HAMILTON: It's a German name, and it means cattle plague.

CHARLES: This is Keith Hamilton, a veterinarian formerly at the World Organization for Animal Health in Paris now working at the Veterinary School at Kansas State University. Some of the most devastating rinderpest outbreaks, he says, happened in Europe centuries ago.

HAMILTON: And in fact, it was feared as much as the Black Death.

CHARLES: Because when cattle herds died, people lost meat, milk and the animal power they needed to plow their fields. In the 1950s, science delivered an answer - an effective vaccine.

HAMILTON: There was a massive kind of coordinated effort to try and eradicate rinderpest.

CHARLES: And it succeeded. Scientists are now confident that the virus no longer survives in the wild. But it does survive at scientific institutes that study the disease or made the vaccine - 27 of them according to a new article that Hamilton and several colleagues wrote for the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. The World Organization for Animal Health says that's too many because there's always a risk that someone could accidentally release the virus or even do it on purpose. The organization is now trying to persuade those research centers to destroy the samples.

HAMILTON: It's a huge responsibility because if the virus did escape, the consequences of an outbreak would be massive now, and it would be a huge embarrassment to that facility.

CHARLES: The Organization for Animal Health has named five research centers as authorized locations to store the virus. One is in the United States at the U.S. government's Animal Disease Center on Plum Island just off the eastern tip of Long Island, N.Y. Dan Charles, NPR News.

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