Brother Of Man Who Died At Bataclan: 'I Want Rock And Roll' For Him : Parallels Matthieu Mauduit is hoping to bring The Rolling Stones and David Bowie to the funeral of his brother, Cedric Mauduit, 41, an avid rock fan who was killed at a concert during the attacks in Paris.
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Brother Of Man Who Died At Bataclan: 'I Want Rock And Roll' For Him

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Brother Of Man Who Died At Bataclan: 'I Want Rock And Roll' For Him

Brother Of Man Who Died At Bataclan: 'I Want Rock And Roll' For Him

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Victims of the attacks included a newlywed groom whose bride remains critically injured and the cousin of a soccer player on the French national team. Another was a local government department head from outside to Paris who loved rock music. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports from Normandy that his brother is hoping for a musical tribute.

SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, BYLINE: Matthieu Mauduit and his brother Cedric who was four years older shared many things.

MATTHIEU MAUDUIT: We born the same day, same hospital, same bed, so we were very close even if we didn't see each other. And I could say everything to him, and he could say everything to me. And he was my idol.

NELSON: Cedric Mauduit was killed at Bataclan concert hall in a hail of bullets and bombs in the terror attacks that have shaken the world.

MAUDUIT: I saw the event on TV Friday night, and I couldn't imagine that my brother was there because it was his son's birthday the next day. And the next day, in the morning, I had a phone call. Even before I knew what it was, I knew it was for my brother. I was feeling it.

NELSON: It was their mother on the line. She told him Cedric was missing and wasn't answering his phone.

MAUDUIT: I said OK. I'm going to Paris. I cried a lot, took a shower, coffee, took my car, picked up my brother's wife and went to Paris. We did not know what we'd find.

NELSON: We soon learned the 41-year-old was dead, as was another of the five friends who'd gone to see a rock concert, Matthieu Mauduit says.

MAUDUIT: And since, I'm living a nightmare, a permanent nightmare.

NELSON: He says he hasn't stopped crying and barely sleeps. But Mauduit says in the depth of his despair, he had a brainstorm to honor his brother who was a passionate rock music fan with a personal tribute from his favorite performers, the Rolling Stones and David Bowie.

MAUDUIT: So I wrote a post on Facebook to my friends first. They told me, open it to everybody, so then I did. Then somebody told me, go on Twitter, so I did. And then let's call some peoples.

NELSON: And the efforts are bearing fruit, with #rollingstonesforcedric gaining a following on Twitter. Intermediaries have promised to talk to the stars.

MAUDUIT: I just want to remember happy things, and happy is music, rock 'n' roll. I want rock 'n' roll for my brother.

NELSON: He says he knows it's a long shot and hasn't heard from the performers yet, but he hopes the Stones and Bowie will attend his brother's funeral, adding he'd be happy with a videotaped tribute too. Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, NPR News in Rouen, France.

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