Sick Snakes Seized From A Baltimore Apartment Sixty-six snakes in poor condition — sick and hungry — were found in a Baltimore apartment. An animal rescue shelter has put out a call for supplies.
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Sick Snakes Seized From A Baltimore Apartment

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Sick Snakes Seized From A Baltimore Apartment

Sick Snakes Seized From A Baltimore Apartment

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LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Most animal rescue groups deal with the furrier and cuter of the species. You've seen the commercials featuring puppies with long faces and sad music. But this week, officials from Baltimore's animal control department acting on a tip reporting a bad smell confiscated dozens of sick snakes from a Baltimore apartment. When I say dozens, I mean 66 snakes. There were pythons and boas, some 10 feet long, which violates city and state laws. You'll be glad to know that you're not allowed to have snakes longer than 5 feet in your Maryland home. Here's the bad news, if you don't already think 66 snakes are bad news. The reptiles were in terrible condition, sick, hungry; some had to be euthanized. The snakes ended up at an animal rescue shelter that primarily deals with dogs and cats. The shelter put out a call for help asking for supplies like duct tape and heat lamps. The shelter made a point to say that every animal needs love, whether they scamper or slither.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CRAWLING KING SNAKE")

THE DOORS: (Singing) Well, I'm the crawling king snake, and I rule my den.

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