Doctors In Flint, Mich., Push A Healthy Diet To Fight Lead Exposure : The Salt Even low levels of lead in children can cause learning or behavioral problems, the CDC says. But foods packed with calcium, iron and vitamin C can help reduce the absorption of lead in kids.
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Doctors In Flint, Mich., Push A Healthy Diet To Fight Lead Exposure

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Doctors In Flint, Mich., Push A Healthy Diet To Fight Lead Exposure

Doctors In Flint, Mich., Push A Healthy Diet To Fight Lead Exposure

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In the midst of the talk of water in Flint, Mich., some of it still contaminated with lead, there's now a push to alert parents that healthy food can help reduce the effects of lead exposure. Rebecca Kruth, with member station Michigan Radio, begins her report in a kitchen there.

REBECCA KRUTH, BYLINE: A bright red tablecloth adds a pop of color to Ashara Manns' kitchen in her Southwest Flint home. The newlywed substitute teacher is nearby at the stove, where she pours two bottles of water into a stockpot before dumping in big bags of mixed greens.

ASHARA MANNS: Normally, I would rinse these with the running water. So hopefully they're still safe.

KRUTH: Flint residents have been told not to drink or cook with the city's lead-tainted tap water. So Ashara and her husband Bennie rely on bottled water to prepare their meals.

A. MANNS: I used to just get whatever I wanted at the grocery store. But now I have to plan my meals around how much water I have or how much water I'm going to buy that week.

BENNIE MANNS: Greens, as big as a pot of that is - I mean, that's a ton of water. Yeah, I love greens. But I can't have stuff I love because I have to worry about water. But, I mean - boiled eggs, rice, pasta, you know - it takes water.

KRUTH: Healthy eating is especially important to Bennie. He's a bodybuilder and personal trainer.

B. MANNS: I don't put sink water in my protein drinks and stuff like that anymore.

KRUTH: The couple has a filter on their kitchen faucet that's designed to take out the lead. But Ashara doesn't trust it, especially when it comes to the couple's 4-year-old daughter, Jada.

JADA: I like to cook some vegetables.

KRUTH: Ashara recently had Jada's lead level tested. It was 2.5. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers five to be high in children, but no level of lead is considered safe. The CDC says even low levels can impact a child's IQ and academic performance, and the effects are irreversible. But there is something experts say can help mitigate the effects of lead exposure.

MONA HANNA-ATTISHA: Diets high in iron, calcium and vitamin C can limit the absorption of lead in your body and can promote its excretion.

KRUTH: Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha is the Flint pediatrician who found that the percentage of kids with elevated lead levels in Flint doubled after the city switched its drinking water source. Now Hanna-Attisha is trying to get the word out to parents that healthy eating can help mitigate the effects of lead exposure. Her employer, Hurley Medical Center, has put out a cookbook of simple, kid-friendly recipes - meals like a cheesy hamburger skillet made with lean meat, cheese and vegetables. It's packed with the iron, calcium and vitamin C experts recommend to help protect against lead absorption. At the farmers market in downtown Flint, there are even free cooking demos where people can sample and learn how to make the recipes.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Season with a little bit of salt, little bit of pepper.

HANNA-ATTISHA: We can't just say, eat this, eat this. They have to be kind of kid-tested in our community to make sure that, you know, the families - they're are culturally sensitive, that they're, you know, things that they want to eat.

KRUTH: Ashara and Bennie Manns say their family is blessed. Eating healthy is already an important part of their lifestyle. But they worry about how much longer they'll have to get by on bottled water.

B. MANNS: At the end of the night, that's what we talk about - you know, are we going to, you know, stay, or what are we going to do to fix the problem - versus asking about each other's day. It's usually that.

KRUTH: The couple says they'll keep doing what they have to to keep their family as safe from lead as possible, especially since this summer, they'll welcome their second child. For NPR, I'm Rebecca Kruth in Flint, Mich.

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